Initiative Münchner Galerien zeitgenößischer Kunst

 

Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle

Amalienstr. 41 (Rgb.)  • 80799 M
Tel. +49 89 33 36 86 • Fax: +49 89 34 22 96
www.galerie-schoettle.deinfo@galerie-schoettle.de
Tue-Fri 1-6 pm

Amalienstr. 41
80799 München

Current exhibitions


Upcoming exhibitions

Helene Appel – Thu Van Tran

Helene Appel – Thu Van Tran

12.09.2020 - 14.11.2020
Im September zeigen wir Arbeiten von Helene Appel und Thu Van Tran. Als Motiv dienen der beiden
Künstlerinnen Vorbilder aus der Natur.
In der neuen Werkgruppe von Helene Appel wird die Malerei weiterhin um ihre technischen Möglichkeiten und Grenzen hin untersucht.
Die Arbeiten von Thu Van Tran konstruieren einen offenen Raum, in dem sich die Geschichte in
der Natur manifestiert.

Thu Van Tran
Penetrable - Rainforest, 2020
Gummi und Pigment auf transparenter Polyesterfaser
180 x 150 cm
Foto: Wilfried Petzi
Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle
 

Past exhibitions

Florian Süssmayr

Florian Süssmayr

30.05.2020 - 31.07.2020
Florian Süssmayr began to paint Saint Sebastian long before Corona. Now, the imagery of the patron saint of plague victims hits a special nerve. Therefore, Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle is all the more delighted to open its doors again and present you the newest works of this Munich-based painter.

It is not the subject of Saint Sebastian as such that interests the artist—Süssmayr focuses his attention on the surface laid over it, the one in front of it, which changes the pictorial space through interventions. Surfaces are the thematic thread that spins through the exhibition Florian Süssmayr zeigt (2020).

On view for the first time are large-format textile works that play with overlapping motifs and media in a manner typical for the artist. They are based on some of his curtain paintings, which he photographed and manipulated digitally to finally use them as a basis to create woven textiles. These works were made in cooperation with the Augsburg Textile and Industry Museum (tim) in this technique using their looms. They are doubled constructions of textile and texture, material and materiality.

One of the curtain paintings was part of last year’s exhibition Hey Psycho! at the Arsenale Institute for Politics of Representation, which took place during the Biennale di Venezia. In it, curator Wolfgang Scheppe juxtaposed Florian Süssmayr’s with conceptual artist Douglas Gordon’s works. Both artists share a self-reflexive way of working and a fondness for Alfred Hitchcock’s device of mirror images in the 1960 film Psycho. Their Self Portraits show that “that both artists only approach their perception of the world through the agency of mediatization. Mimesis or the imitation of perceived nature is inevitably already overcome as a deceptive immediacy.” Hence, their own view of things is firmly inscribed in each image.

A-boards, which we usually see in front of bars or coffeeshops, extend the two-dimensional surface into the physical space. In this part of the exhibition, visitors pass several subjects Florian Süssmayr is known for. But instead of presenting today’s specials, they open new visual worlds. (J.Singer)

Florian Süssmayr
Hey Sebastian, 2020
Öl auf Leinwand
160 x 100 cm
courtesy Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle

 
 

Stephan Balkenhol

Stephan Balkenhol

07.02.2020 - 22.05.2020
After more than thirty years of collaboration with Stephan Balkenhol, it is a great pleasure to presentthe artist’s twentieth exhibition at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle.Stephan Balkenhol is best-known—aside from his bronze sculptures in public spaces around theworld—for his virtuosic wood sculptures worked from a single piece of wood. A chainsaw first givesthe trunk a rough outline, then chisel and mallet do the precision work carving out the figures. Finally,a carefully applied layer of paint breathes life into them. Try as you might to catch their glance, theyare floating on a different level. The delicately rendered facial features do not give any clues aboutthe figures’ rough beginnings. Only the base and the surfaces of individual body parts bear witness tothe energetic work process. It, in turn, was preceded by hand-drawn sketches of the subjects.Stephan Balkenhol is a gifted illustrator. Drawing is his language without words, telling many stories.First ideas are sketched out, contours determined, some parts detailed in watercolor. Portraits aremade with charcoal, the loose flow yielding images that also tend to look inward. No joy, no pain canbe extracted from these faces; they remain open to interpretation, and the viewer is cached bymaking a similarly expressionless, contemplative face.The human being is always at the center of Stephan Balkenhol’s work and is given a twist in hisfamous hybrid creatures—sculptures pointing to the animal in us: the Hare Man, the Ant Man, thePoodle Lady, the Rooster Man, the Lion Man, or the busy Mouse Man. There is no shortage ofsubject matter and enough humor in Stephan Balkenhol’s oeuvre. We look forward to presenting theartist’s new drawings, sculptures, and hybrid creatures.Stephan Balkenhol’s works have been shown around the globe in numerous international exhibitionsand are now part of many museum collections. 2020 will see solo presentations at Museum Jorn inSilkeborg, Denmark, and at Lehmbruck Museum in Duisburg, Germany

Stephan Balkenhol
Mouse Man, 2020
29,7 x 21 cm
watercolour on paper

 
 

Candida Höfer

Candida Höfer

In Moskau - В Mоскве

22.11.2019 - 01.02.2020
For more than five decades, Candida Höfer has been making a name for herself internationally as an artist working in photography. Her works linger in the viewers’ memory: Images of magnificent Baroque theaters, light-drenched museums devoid of human beings, or the manifold structures of libraries from various historic periods exert their effect in their negotiation of light, order, detail, and color. Her works are created during various travels and follow either the artist’s own explorations or invitations she receives. In 2017, Candida Höfer visited Moscow, which yielded new works that are now shown to the public for the first time in the exhibition In Moskau –В Mоскве at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle. These works bear Candida Höfer’s famous signature in giving lasting, detailed insights into Moscow’s architecture. The work Bolshoi Teatr Moskwa II 2017, for instance, captivates us with its clearly defined structures and also with the warmth exuded by the lighting and colors. The linear-perspective shot, the absence of people in the frame, and the chosen angle invite us to enter the picture, take a seat, and become part of the stunning architecture. Like so often in Höfer’s images, human absence also permits us to look at what these spaces are supposed to mean for people and the way in which these spaces produce their effect. Thus the image not only becomes a projection surface for the beholder but also references the intentions of the spaces’ creators as well as the uses given these spaces throughout their history. Candida Höfer studied photography under Bernd Becher in Düsseldorf from 1976 to 1982. Since the mid-1970s, her photographic works have been displayed in numerous solo exhibitions and in the most important museums of Europe and the United States.

Candida Höfer
Bolshoi Teatr Moskwa II 2017
C-Print, 184 x 265,3 cm
© Candida Höfer, Köln / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019
 

Viola Relle & Raphael Weilguni

Viola Relle & Raphael Weilguni

bring me back to earth

22.11.2019 - 01.02.2020
For the first time ever, Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle is showing abstract works by Viola Relle and Raphael Weilguni, alumni of the Academy of Fine Arts, Munich, in a solo exhibition. The artist duo’s sculptures organically interweave and dynamically repel each other. In this constellation, the materials—ceramics and porcelain—appear like authentically movable elements seemingly leading lives of their own. Ab-stract forms entirely free of associations are created. A sculpture without beginning or end, a structure in which the associative eye of the beholder seeks a point of reference and seems to discover thefamiliar only to lose itself once again in the fray of complete abstraction. The sculptures reveal an i n-terplay of thebeholder’s searching eye and the twisted object. The works create tension — one which has built up in the artist couple’s collaboration. Control andequanimity, a constant give and take, a symphony of a relationship between two people transferred to their sculptures, thus creating new emotions — or do the sculptures march to the beat of their own drum, like living elements? The lines are blurred, and with each sculpture the artists pose the same question: How far can one goonce the line of controllability is crossed and at what point does the construct collapse? They use porcelain and ceramics, combining materials in a detailed composition and by adding wax and plaster the artists give the works their final form. Durch das Weiterarbeiten mit Wachs und Gips geben sie denArbeiten ihre finale Form. bring me back to earth is a title these sculptures might have given themselves — as an autonomous living organism. Free from worldly gravitation, the sculptures develop a new language of art. And if thevisitor reads this language attentively enough, a world of detailed interconnections in interpersonal bonds and relationships between nature and industry opens up. Relle and Weilguni studied at the Academy of Fine Arts Munich—Weilguni in the class of Jean-Marc Bustamante, Florian Pumhösl. Relle under Norbert Prangenberg, Kerstin Brätsch and Nicole Wermers. In 2019, they participated in the Thirteenth Fellbach Triennial of Small-scale Sculpture and won the Bavarian Art Studio Support Program Award for visual artists. (S.)

Viola Relle & Raphael Weilguni
Wir haben vieles richtig gemacht, 2018
glasierte Keramik
71 x 31 x 40 cm

 
 

Ding Yi

Ding Yi

Appearance of Crosses

13.09.2019 - 16.11.2019
Ding Yi
Appearance of Crosses, 2019
Mixed media on basswood
120 x 120 cm
© Ding Yi and ShanghART Gallery

 
 

Susan Weil

Susan Weil

Once In A Blue Moon

06.06.2019 - 31.08.2019
This exhibition marks the first time the US painter Susan Weil, b. 1930, presents her work at Galerie RüdigerSchöttle. The artist studied at Black Mountain College under Josef Albers, together with Willem and Elainede Kooning, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, and Cy Twombly. Despite her abstract expressionist style,the artist, unlike her male counterparts, never let herself be influenced by the prevailing tendencies of thetime. An important member of the New York School of Art, Susan Weil refuses to be categorized in any onestyle, and despite being influenced by abstract expressionism, she never completely forgot about the powerof the figurative.
The exhibition Once In A Blue Moon comprises seminal works from 1989 to the present. Taking familiarobjects as a starting point, Susan Weil reduces all elements to their intrinsic nature to then reconstruct themin unexpected ensembles. Her work Wandering Chairs, a cooperation with her son Christoph Rauschenberg,consists of two chairs and the artist’s portrait, assembled like a puzzle from our different pieces. The viewer’ssearching eye is first captured by the entire picture full of movement and disruption. Gradually, one is willingto engage in the artist’s game, constructing with her a new world in which the objects find each other inunanticipated ways.
The composition of her works is always poetic, dynamic, and playful; it often seems as though the worksdance on the walls. Weil translates her precise observations and detailed perception of life into the vividlanguage of art. This is reflected in playful components such as those in the work Mind’s Sky. This work wasalready shown in 1989 in an exhibition curated by Carla Schulz-Hoffmann in what was then the StaatsgalerieModerner Kunst in Munich. In the freely assembled collage, the depiction of the birds is lofty and to the point,as if it were a vague memory of a dream.
Susan Weil is a Guggenheim Fellow and National Endowment for the Arts Fellow. Her works are included inthe Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art in New York, Victoria and Albert Museum London, J.Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, and the Helsinki Art Museum.
(S.Sokolov)

Susan Weil
Wandering Chairs, 1998
silver gelatin print
113 x 302 cm
© S. Weil and C. Rauschenberg

 
 

Thomas Ruff

Thomas Ruff

Series

05.04.2019 - 01.06.2019
Thomas Ruff is renowned for his conceptual approach. In the late 1970s he helped shape the paradigm shift from documentary to art photography and continues to enrich the genre with new ideas: from the interior views of German living spaces of the 1950s and ’70s, the oversize portraits, to the photographs of buildings reduced to their core, followed by shots of the night sky, which marked the first time Ruff did not create work based on his own photographs. The subsequent series were also shaped by the investigation and inspiration of found photographic footage. Here, Ruff’s main concern was not the mere depiction of an interesting scene but rather the idea from which these images evolved. The Negative series has Thomas Ruff relying on nineteenth-century original photographs, scanning the originals, inverting the appealing subjects into their negatives, and transforming the typical sepia tones into cyan blue, thus expanding the former manual photochemical process with digital cyanotypes.
Computers operate nonstop in Thomas Ruff’s studio. Whereas the internet was still dissected for its visual structures in the Nudes, Substrat and JPEG series, the artist successfully designed digital photograms in a virtual darkroom using a 3-D program he developed specifically for this purpose. Objects such as spheres, glass containers, spirals, sticks, lenses, or crystals are generated in 3-D on the computer to then cover digital paper with them. The colored lights are placed and rendered together with the objects as an image, the objects’ positions, color gradient, light, and shading are altered. The results are digital photograms with a diverse, highly nuanced color gradient, an endless interplay of reflections and surface structures, and a high-definition light distribution that seems to extend infinitely in space.
For his most recent series, Thomas Ruff went to the photography archive of the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, where he discovered photographs by Linnaeus Tripe from the 1850s. Architectural and topographic images of monuments in India and Burma served Tripe as inspiration. Fascinated by the fragile material, Thomas Ruff has revived these heretofore unknown photographs in a sort of posthumous cooperation with Tripe.
His scholarly eye for the medium of photography and his analytic approach, which includes state-of-the-art technology, without fail lead to ever-new image creations. The exhibition Thomas Ruff “Series” offers insight into the diversity of his work groups and an overview of his most recent series. (IL)

Thomas Ruff
Interieur 6A, 1979
chromogenic print
57 x 47 cm
© VG-Bildkunst, Bonn 2019

 
 

Thu van Tran

Thu van Tran

Colors of grey

07.02.2019 - 30.03.2019
French-Vietnamese artist Thu Van Tran’s work is deeply entwined with her processing and contemplating her own origins. Born in Vietnam, she arrived in France a refugee at the age of two. Her personal history, rooted in a collective mind, is marked by wartime and migrant experiences that she conveys in her works. To give voice to the past, the artist utilizes various materials and media—rubber, pigment, photography, and six specific, ever-recurrent colors that symbolize wartime experiences and some of the most grueling human-rights and environmental abuses in modern times. In her first exhibition at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, Thu Van Tran is showing works from the series Colors of grey, consisting of a fresco and drawings. Some other works as drawings and sculptures refer to the equilibrium between beauty and violence often recurrent in her work.

Thu Van Tran
Colors of grey, 2019
Pigment auf Papier
150 x 210 cm

 
 

Janis Avotins

Janis Avotins

Find A Point From Which To See And Yet Avoid The Glow

07.02.2019 - 30.03.2019
Jānis Avotiņš’s idiosyncratic, aesthetically refined paintings have made him one of the most promising young Latvian artists. His style is unmistakable: With highly atmospheric density, Avotiņš paints human figures in unreal spaces. The grainy, cloudy visual language is reminiscent of the faded photographs from the early days of the medium. Occasionally, the figures seem to detach from the surface; the outlines become blurred and diminish, thus symbolizing moments of transformation and dissipation. This allows Avotiņš’s paintings to capture the volatility and thrownness of human existence in a particularly moving way. Jānis Avotiņš has kept pursuing his deep interest in the human condition in his new works, creating his characteristic setting with figures who are introverted or at times seem lost in considerate conversation.

Jānis Avotiņš
Untitled, 2019
Öl auf Leinwand
32 × 19 cm

 
 

Still Life

Still Life

30.11.2018 - 02.02.2019
Helene Appel; Anders Clausen; Rodney Graham; Thomas Helbig;
Lorena Herrera Rashid;Candida Höfer; Ma Ke; Karin Kneffel;
Goshka Macuga;Thomas Ruff; Anri Sala; Elif Saydam;
Thomas Struth; Florian Süssmayr; Thu Van Tran;
Jeff Wall; Chen Wei; Susan Weil

Thomas Struth
Rotfuchs (Vulpes vulpes), Leibniz IZW, Berlin, 2017, 2017
inkjet print
90.5x 112 cm, © Thomas Struth

The final exhibition in the gallery’s fiftieth-anniversary year, bringing together various works of artists it represents, is dedicated to the still life. Unmoving or inanimate objects have been the subject of art since the genesis of painting, long before nature morte was elevated to its own painterly discipline in the seventeenth century. But how does the still life fare today in contemporary art? Is transience still a significant issue?
Helene Appel applies paint directly to the untreated canvas, whose coarse structure serves as the organized backdrop of her still lifes. Grains of rice, slabs of meat, refuse, or other everyday things are brought to the canvas in a trompe l’oeil style. The objects conjure a virtually haptic effect, which in turn is transformed into abstraction due to the objects’ arrangement and the interplay of the canvas’s linear texture.
As a photographer, Candida Höfer’s name is closely associated with the portrayal of deserted interiors whose aura has a hypnotic effect on the viewer. Her lesser-known still lifes, however, use a narrative and poetic language to document situations from everyday life, which in these works transforms into seemingly methodically composed color photographs.
Karin Kneffel is a virtuosic painter of realistic scenes. Her works conflate meticulous research with the imaginary. She investigates her subjects layer by layer, all while being just as interested in the stages of change as in playing with the effects of painting, the textures, the colors, and the illusionistic appearance. Veristic attention to detail in her still lifes lets us look at the day-to-day as if we beheld it for the first time.
Thomas Struth’s Rotfuchs from his series of dead animals shows us a fox that died of natural causes and, like the other animals in this series, was examined professionally for its species’ protection. Still and dignified, the cadaver lies before us as if it had just taken its last breath. The beauty of nature, paired with its finitude, here has become a haunting memento mori.
Jeff Wall directs the viewer’s gaze into the window of a flower shop without flowers. Empty vases and flowerpots sit behind the window; only a tulle-like flower construction and brittle twigs point to its function. Two cartons, one reading, “18 candelite cardette,” hint at their possible contents: material needed for flower arrangements. One isn’t quite sure if this is a staged or an everyday and therefore random situation. The viewers invariably start analyzing details and developing their own story.
Along with numerous other works, this exhibition marks the first time that photograms by the artists Susan Weil and Thu-Van Tran are shown. They offer a sneak peek of the gallery’s program next year. But first, visitors are invited to linger and find tranquility in pondering the question mentioned at the beginning, and to discover the diversity of the contemporary still life. (IL)
 

 
 

Thomas Zipp

Thomas Zipp

A Frozen Fountain (the family of pills)

30.11.2018 - 02.02.2019
Thomas Zipp
P.N.G.M., 2010
Anroechter Stein und Holz
70 x 60 x 70 cm

Thomas Zipp is known for his complex spatial installations and laboratories, which he increasingly presents in connection with performances. And his installation “A Primer of Higher Space (The Family of Man revisited)", recently realized at Kunsthalle Gießen, not only calls into question our society’s norms in an apocalyptic and at the same time everyday scenario, it also lets the visitors themselves slip into the role of performer and become part of this empirical research. Thomas Zipp retrospectively investigates art, science, and literature to link them with the present; what’s past is pushed into the present to reinterrogate human action on the basis of ostensible facts. Psychology and society are his central themes; existing value systems are constantly explored and re-explored by Thomas Zipp, opening up new ways of questioning the here and now.
A Professor of Painting at the Berlin University of the Arts, Thomas Zipp entirely avoids the art of painting—one of the pivotal means of expression in his oeuvre—in the aforementioned exhibition. Often, however, it is precisely his paintings that manage to decipher central thought processes and facts. In terms of composition, Zipp’s idiosyncratic handwriting serves as an important stylistic device. Letters arranged in a certain way point to the literature he consulted; he often quotes entire passages as part of the composition. The initials in the works’ titles refer to the person depicted, who often appears as a stand-alone portrait next to the painting. The paintings can be read as manuals for the underlying ideas. Humans are always at the center of his “analytical” paintings, which always also include motifs from the darker reaches of the unconscious. After the previous large-scale spatial installations at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, Hier (Futuristic Mess) (2007) and Aids To Theater Technique (2010), Thomas Zipp places his subtly conceived paintings and sculptures in his current exhibition “A Frozen Fountain (the family of pills)” in the focus of his social investigations. (IL)
Thomas Zipp studied under Thomas Bayrle at Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main and at the Slade School of Fine Art in London. He lives and works in Berlin and has been Professor of Painting and Multimedia at the Berlin University of the Arts since 2008. His works are represented in numerous public and private collections. Especially notable among his international exhibitions are MENS AGITAT MOLEM. Luther & The Family of Pills, Sammlung Goetz, Munich (2009), White Reformation Co-op Mens Sana in Corpore Sano, Kunsthalle Fridericianum, Kassel (2010), Comparative Investigation about the Disposition of the Width of a Circle, Palazzo Rossini (Biennale di Venezia), Venice (2013).

 
 

Tal R

In Kooperation mit CFA Berlin

15.09.2018 - 24.11.2018
 

Jan Merta / Lorena Herrera Rashid

Jan Merta / Lorena Herrera Rashid

15.09.2018 - 24.11.2018
Jan Merta
Sestřička III / Nurse III, 2018
Öl auf Leinwand
260 x 230 cm
Courtesy Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle
 

Toulu Hassani

Toulu Hassani

Circling the Evolute

08.06.2018 - 03.08.2018
Toulu Hassani’s second solo exhibition at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle merges her two key methodologies: delicate oil paintings and visual objects made of artificial resin. Her distinct interest in the way humans try to interpret and represent the world through theories and models is intrinsic to, and clearly visible in, her works. How can unconnected and unexplained vicinities become graspable, and what underlying order is holding it all together? Science’s tireless drive toward understanding and describing the world in its smallest details and largest contexts is what fascinates Hassani. One always notes the extraordinary accuracy that goes into both the execution and the preceding meticulous trials in which materials, colors, papers, or forms are tested.
In her new works, Hassani masterfully picks up on her typical paintings, in variations on structures that move across the entire screen and let the beholder’s eye search in vain for a beginning, end, middle, and system. Miniature-like staircase forms are twisted inversely; one is reminded of representations of helixes. Hassani is often inspired by scientific theories and their abstraction of micro-realm realities as well as, for instance, approaches to physical phenomena like gravitational fields and force lines, or even cartography. Topics like thermodynamics or space-time curvature and their respective visual and mathematical languages in the form of density allocations or matrixes are variants that serve to describe the world and the cosmos in abstracted formulas and illustrations. Scientific approaches and models are used by Hassani such that she develops them further with her own formal concepts, following no line of argument but placing the focus on that which cannot be expected. Never wanting to explain the world, her works only want to complement it for their own sake and stand for themselves.

Toulu Hassani was a master student in the class of Walter Dahn, among others, at the Braunschweig University of Art. In 2014, she was a scholar in the International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP) in New York. In 2016, her work was shown as a “New Position” at Art Cologne and she was awarded the Sprengel Prize for Fine Art of the Lower Saxony Sparkassen Foundation in the course of a solo exhibition at Sprengel Museum Hannover. In 2017, she presented a solo exhibition at Rudolf-Scharpf Galerie at Wilhelm-Hack-Museum in Ludwigshafen.
(S. Kunz)

Toulu Hassani
Ohne Titel, 2018
Feinminenstift und Öl auf Leinwand
50 x 39 cm

 
 

David Claerbout

David Claerbout

The pure necessity

08.06.2018 - 03.08.2018
We are pleased to present a new solo exhibition by the Belgian video artist David Claerbout on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle. The pure necessity is the title of Claerbout’s latest video work, which explores the animated classic film The Jungle Book - which, incidentally, celebrated its 50th anniversary last year.
"The pure necessity" centers exclusively on the representation of animals, their sounds, and the noise of nature. Claerbout abstains from using dialog, music, or dance - and apart from a little girl with a water jug, there are no human beings in his version of the Jungle Book. Twelve animation artists collaborated with Claerbout on this large-scale project, creating individual color drawings to help him realize this 50-minute animation film, which omits the animals’ anthropomorphization and puts a new spin on the familiar story. The narrative is decelerated, the animals behave as such, and we, the viewers, are once again reminded of how we as individuals or species either coexist or exist separately in our own worlds here on earth - a notion that is representative of the modern individual. Always bearing the original in mind, one waits in vain for character interaction or smiling faces; what remains is the “normal” day-to-day existence in the jungle, where everyone follows their instincts. In contrast to the post-war era, we no longer merely seek distraction or entertainment in films. Video art has long established itself as a medium for new narrative forms, and David Claerbout is certainly one of the masters of this genre - taking technique, timing, and narration to a new level and captivating audiences via their subconscious.
Along with the film, the exhibition will feature drawings from "The pure necessity" by David Claerbout.

David Claerbout (*1969 in Kortrijk) lives and works in Antwerp and Berlin. His works are represented in international collections and are exhibited regularly in the most renowned museums worldwide, most recently in the Pinacoteca in São Paulo and Schaulager Basel. Two of his major works are currently on view at Espace Louis Vuitton in Munich until August 25, 2018, and Kunsthaus Bregenz will open a solo exhibition on July 14, which will also present Claerbout’s version of "The Jungle Book", among other works. (J. Singer)

David Claerbout
The pure necessity, 2016
single channel projection, 2d animation
stereo sound, 50 min.
© David Claerbout

 
 

Ma Ke

Ma Ke

13.04.2018 - 02.06.2018
This presentation marks the first time the works of Chinese artist Ma Ke are shown in a solo exhibition at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle. Ma Ke’s paintings captivate viewers with the clarity of their expression and their subtle power. His motifs of people in ostensibly adventurous and challenging settings, at times with dangerous set pieces, appear to us like scenes from a theatrical play. Bodies and faces are often dramatized, seeming masklike and exaggerated in their unnatural distortions and expressiveness, which is, paradoxically, what makes them even more readable and striking. Occasionally, one believes to be witnessing a circus act in which the protagonists must perform acrobatic feats using all manner of tricks and gimmicks. Partly, the images’ disquieting air is further heightened by the seemingly artificial light shining down on the goings-on. The portrayals deal with human balancing acts that visualize the purely physical level as well as psychological moments. The figures are busy striving, hoping, and trying to strike a balance with both themselves and their stage partners. The images raise the question of whether they depict creatures facing their challenges apprehensively, boldly, or somewhere in-between or individuals suffering from their isolation and yearning for collective support.
For his exhibition in Munich, Ma Ke reexamines his recurring motif of the rider, who symbolizes the free individual for him and in whom he recognizes the image of Dionysus. In some instances, one may interpret the rider as the antithesis of those figures in the paintings that are constrained in their mobility by often indefinable objects: Conversely, the rider is untethered, even capable of overcoming gravity. The rider figure is regularly featured in Tang poetry (618–907 CE), where he is portrayed in moments of return or departure. Romantic landscapes steeped in the light of dusk and reflective surfaces of various bodies of water, sketched in a poetically reduced language, serve as backdrops in these early poems. Against these backgrounds, the rider is described in situations in which he effectively ascends to the heavens and is absorbed by them. No longer having to fight or hope, he is on his own independent path to a brighter future.

Ma Ke (born in Zibo, China) studied painting at the Tianjin Academy of Fine Arts and at the Central Academy of Fine Arts. In 1998/1999, he was a visiting professor of painting in Eritrea, where he gathered culturally significant experiences that have also found their way into his art. In 2017, Ma Ke completed an artist residency with the Laforêt Summer Vacation Project in Italy. He lives and works in Beijing. (S. Kunz)

Ma Ke
Sky, 2017
Öl auf Leinwand
60 x 50 cm

 
 

Sophie Reinhold

Sophie Reinhold

Why talk of love at a time like this?!

13.04.2018 - 02.06.2018
Veils of color materializing in subtle mists, geometric grid patterns delicately inscribing themselves into the image, and figurative visual elements scattered across the canvas in a state of weightless suspension: Sophie Reinhold’s paintings combine contrasting ways of composition whose arrangement produces a harmonious whole and a contemplative atmosphere.
In her paintings the Berlin-based artist explores how the concepts of veiling, camouflage, and emptiness clash with those of presence, impact, and strong expression. Manifestations of these two effects determine each other. Without hiding or overlapping, without withdrawing from expression, its essence cannot be profoundly recognized and comprehended. It is a necessary concurrent counterweight that emerges in the process of Reinhold’s composition over a prolonged period, one that can ultimately be read in its condensed form. The care that went into accentuating the forces that are at odds with each other and into the harmonizing components is clearly visible in her oil and marble-dust paintings. Images are created layer by layer, many spots then sanded down again, achieving a depth and sublimity that directly affect viewers, causing them to pause and reflect.
Not only the paintings themselves play with contrasting display and dominance to the reserve and incompleteness on the canvas: These forces are also active within humans and can therefore be understood on both a mental and a physical level. The will of the ego and its strife for expanding its position with the simultaneous desire to hide, to conceal, and to isolate are common phenomena. Reinhold shows us this game, this grappling, in a wholly idiosyncratic way. And her images bear witness to a deep love of vulnerable creatures – people that at once fight and flee, scream and fall silent, reveal themselves and hide, love and hate. With reduced means and without putting their full physicality on display, she gives them an ominous platform, full of wit and charm. And sometimes, all that is left of these creatures is an aura, an echo of their energy.

Sophie Reinhold (born in Berlin in 1981) studied under Antje Majewski at Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weißensee, prior to that under Amelie von Wulffen at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna and at the Academy of Fine Arts Leipzig. As the recipient of the 2012 Villa Romana Prize, she completed an artist residency in Florence. In 2017, she was a visiting professor at the Muthesius University of Fine Arts and Design. This year, Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle will present her work as part of the New Positions at the Art Cologne. (S. Kunz)

 

 
 

Thomas Ruff

Thomas Ruff

neg◊lapresmidi

09.02.2018 - 07.04.2018
Thomas Ruff
neg◊lapresmidi_11, 2016
C-Print, 71 x 61 cm
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2018

Since 2014 Thomas Ruff has been working on his Negatives, a series in which he converts the typical sepia tones of early photography into cyan tones, thus not only harking back to the cyanotypes of yesteryear but also, and more importantly, transforming the positive back into its negative form, a process that raises the means to the end, namely the tonally reversed, negative image as the prerequisite for the ultimate photograph, to the status of an artwork in its own right. Within this series, Thomas Ruff has developed a new cycle of photographs titled neg◊lapresmidi which will be shown in the forthcoming exhibition in its entirety. In a sequence of 25 photographs, Thomas Ruff follows in the tracks of the dance legend Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950). Nijinski was a world-famous dancer of great virtuosity whose leaps through the air seemed to defy gravity. The ballet L'Après-midi d'un faune, which Nijinsky choreographed to the music of Claude Debussy, was first performed in Paris in 1912 by the Ballet Russe and since then has counted among the milestones of modern choreography. Nijinsky’s analytical approach to movement made his faun one of the turning points in the history of dance, for it was in this role that Nijinsky took the very first steps towards abstraction in ballet. Causing no end of scandal, the ballet tells the story of a young faun that on a hot afternoon courts several nymphs in vain and finally satisfies his desire on a veil discarded by one of the nymphs.

Nijinski’s performance has survived in the photographs taken by Baron Adolphe de Meyer, a pioneer of photography who in these photographs succeeded exceptionally in capturing the movement and choreography of the ballet. Using this historically and photographically fascinating source material, Thomas Ruff has created a cycle of photographs that not only revives the individual sequences of this unique ballet performance but also, and most ingeniously, expresses the extraordinary sensuality of the dancers’ bodies and their movements. Through Ruff’s technique of tonal inversion, light, shadow and movement are dramatically heightened and accentuated in new compositions of light and dark that result in completely different visual experiences and impressions of depth. The nymphs seem to be bathed in veils of light, heightening their allure to the very extreme. Nijinsky’s choreographic devices are brought out even more strongly through the inversion of light and dark. Clearly discernible are the angular positions of the dancers’ arms and their abstract movements executed in profile. Light and shadow here become the visual equivalents of movement. Photography as a reminiscence of dance, music and historical photography is here interpreted by the most innovative photographer of our time.

 
 

Cheng Wei

Cheng Wei

Falling Light

09.02.2018 - 07.04.2018
To kick off the 50th anniversary of Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle the rising position of Chinese artist Chen Wei and Thomas Ruff will be presented. Chen Wei was shown in Germany for the first time in 2010 by Rüdiger Schöttle, Thomas Ruff has long since been closely associated with the gallery, where he had his first solo show in 1981.

The works shown in Chen Wei’s new exhibition unite the motifs and issues of his oeuvre of the past several years and develop them further: urban spaces devoid of people, stage-like settings with strong lighting effects, wet ground, sporadic individuals or just their hands in scenes of isolation, symbolically charged elements, like the sparkling coins. The unfinished crops up in the half-laid paving stones in Fresh Paint, while what has been and gone is expressed in Fragment through the tiled floor of a late-night bar, across which are strewn the shards of broken bottles, the remains of a party. Promise is the theme of Sharing Apartment, in which the open door and the warm light behind it evoke, in conjunction with the emptiness of the room in the foreground, an uncanny atmosphere.
Chen Wei’s mises-en-scène address human existence with all its yearnings, with all its helplessness. Human bodies, whether present or absent in the picture, are represented in their attempt to escape the conditioning to which they are subjected in society. It is this theme that the artist brings out so well in his Nightclub Series. Some of the individuals thirsting for moments of freedom seem, precisely in these places of hopeless yearning, to be torpid and stupefied. Where can we find spaces and ways of liberating ourselves? When will we be really free? In his work Two Lights two rings on an index and a middle finger are attached to small white and blue lights. What is their function? Are they modern pieces of jewellery in technoid style or are they digital measuring instruments of the kind used for health tracking? If such is the case, where does our personal health data ultimately land? Chen Wei leaves us with questions about our highly technicized world, as in Mike, where a male figure, his anonymity preserved by deep shadows, thumbs the screen of his Smartphone.
Chen Wei was born in the Chinese province of Zhejiang in 1980. He lives and works in Beijing. In 2017 he had a solo exhibition at the Centre for Contemporary Photography in Melbourne and, in 2016, at the JNBY Foundation in Hangzhou. In 2015 his work could be seen in the group exhibition Contemporary Chinese Photography at the Museum Folkwang in Essen and in a solo exhibition at the K11 Art Space in Shanghai. Chen Wei’s works also belong to numerous internationally prestigious collections.

Chen Wei
Two Lights, 2016
Archival Inkjet Print
40 x 50 cm, © Chen Wei

 
 

Rodney Graham

Rodney Graham

17.11.2017 - 03.02.2018
“50 years and something new” – that's the motto for the forthcoming 12 months, beginning with the solo exhibition of the Canadian artist Rodney Graham on 16th November 2017, for the Rüdiger Schöttle Gallery will be celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2018. Conceptual art, which certainly counts Rodney Graham among its renowned exponents, has from the very beginning been an essential part of the gallery's programme. Rüdiger Schöttle first exhibited Rodney Graham's work in a group exhibition in Munich in 1985. His oeuvre embraces painting, music, film and sculpture, genres in which he often humorously addresses past or contemporary movements and trends in art, culture and philosophy.

In this year's solo exhibition it is music that occupies centre stage. On show will be both new and existing works that have as their theme various genres of music and their respective levels of interpretation.
Shown on the ground floor of the gallery is Graham's multi-piece work “Black Tapestry”, which comprises 25 darkly paintedover copies of Carole King's legendary record album “Tapestry”, with which she celebrated her breakthrough in Rock and Pop Music in 1971. Standing in the middle of the room is a cello on an old Persian carpet, an extended version of “Large Rattle” of 2012. This particular musical instrument was custom-made in Italy and is distinguished by the absence of f-holes, which are essential for a cello's fullness of tone. Silver cuff links were incorporated in the belly of the cello as an additional alienation effect.
Displayed on the first floor are new works belonging to Graham's series of “Rock Paintings”. Here the artist processed 1980s material from Circus Magazine, which at that time had been specializing in Hair Metal. The sources of inspiration for Graham's painted-over rock stars were Robert Rauschenberg and Franz West. The principle of the “quote within a quote” is typical of his works. Shown alongside the “Rock Paintings” is one of Graham's famous Lightboxes: “Dead Flowers in my Studio”, a bunch of withered flowers in a vase standing in Rodney Graham's studio: a memento mori of the artist's everyday life.

Born in Abbotsford, British Columbia, in 1949, Rodney Graham today lives and works in Vancouver. Together with Jeff Wall and Stan Douglas he counts among today's leading exponents of the Vancouver School. His itinerant solo exhibition “That's not me” has been on tour in Europe since the beginning of the year. Following the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art in Gateshead and Museum Voorlinden in Wassenaar the exhibition will be shown at the IMMA in Dublin from the end of November. The Frieder Burda Museum in Baden-Baden will continue to show Graham's monumental Lightboxes until the end of November.

Rodney Graham
Maiden’s Pile-Driving Return, 2017
acrylic gesso, spray paint and paper on canvas
149.8 x 124.4 cm, detail
© Rodney Graham

 
 

Florian Süssmayr

Florian Süssmayr

Selbstportrait

08.09.2017 - 11.11.2017
Selbstdarstellungen bildender Künstler sind ein bekanntes Thema seit der Antike. In der Malerei Florian Süssmayrs spielt das Selbstbildnis eine zentrale Rolle und ist ein immer wieder aufgegriffenes Motiv.
Es sind nicht die realistischen Selbstportraits, angefertigt mit Spiegel, die ihn interessieren, es sind vielmehr Reflektionen von sich selbst im weitesten Sinne. Diese oft auf der vorausgegangenen Fotografie basierenden Werke faszinieren durch ihre malerische Wiedergabe unterschiedlichster Örtlichkeiten; vom Fahrstuhl über die Straßenszene bis hin zum Badezimmerspiegel ist gerade das Alltägliche von Interesse, der Künstler selbst ist darin nur schemenhaft zu erkennen. Er ist in Form seines Umrisses, seines Schattens oder seiner Spiegelung wiedergegeben. Das Ego spielt keine Rolle. Die Umgebung steht geradezu im Vordergrund und weist mehr Details auf als das eigentliche Portrait.
Die Selbstbildnisse sind eng mit der Biographie Florian Süssmayrs verknüpft und erzählen in typischer Manier vom Leben des Künstlers.

Florian Süssmayr
Selbstportrait, 2017
Öl auf Leinwand
160 x 140 cm

 
 

Helene Appel

Helene Appel

02.06.2017 - 29.07.2017
Helene Appel removes familiar things from their domestic environment and places natural phenomena like water puddles at the center of her paintings. In her first solo exhibition at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, she presents textiles, potato peels, wheat grains, refuse, soapsuds, and pieces of raw meat in oil and acrylic paint on linen. In various formats ranging from small to large, the works appear so tangible and real that one cannot help but be pulled in by their presence.
While it only takes a brief moment until soapsuds have dissolved in the dishwater, we all know the way these foaming water bubbles look and feel in our hands - and this is exactly what determines Helene Appel’s seemingly illusionist paintings on raw, untreated linen: They put the beholder in familiar, everyday, and often random situations related to touch, smell, or taste, thus creating immediate associations with the object. The works’ haptic quality even tempts beholders to touch them, so improbable is it that what they are looking at is actually paint on canvas. The potato peels or the pieces of raw meat in other works look as if placed on chopping boards; the refuse arranged as if randomly swept together. Yet each object is portrayed as detached from its spatial surrounding, which draws all the attention to the details.
The curator and author Anna-Catharina Gebbers noted in the exhibition catalogue of Helene Appel’s first institutional solo exhibition at the art museum in Goslar, which was put on as part of her 2011 Kaiserring scholarship, that the talented painter does not treat things like objects in her artistic practice, but uses them to create a parliamentary collective of the human and the non-human - taking a cue from Bruno Latour’s theory of the shift “from Realpolitik to Dingpolitik,” from pragmatic to object-oriented politics.

Helene Appel (b. 1976 in Karlsruhe) studied painting at the University of Fine Arts Hamburg and the Royal College of Art in London. She lives and works in Berlin. Her works are exhibited internationally and are currently on view at the La Gaia Collection in Busca, Italy, the Moenchehaus Museum Goslar, and the Olbricht Collection in Berlin.

Helene Appel
Spülmittel, 2017
Aquarell und Öl auf Leinen
50,3 x 69 cm

 
 

Candida Höfer, Thomas Ruff und Thomas Struth

Candida Höfer, Thomas Ruff und Thomas Struth

07.04.2017 - 27.05.2017
Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle once again presents works from recent series by Candida Höfer, Thomas Ruff, and Thomas Struth. They studied together under Bernd and Hilla Becher at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf in the early 1980s and have kept exploring to this day our cultural and living environments with archival meticulousness.

Over the past year, Candida Höfer created more than twenty works on the newly opened Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg. As is usual for Höfer, she photographed the interiors in the central perspective, but she also took pictures of exteriors and details such as windows and terraces as well as of models by the architects Herzog & de Meuron. Moreover, Höfer focuses also on the seemingly trivial peripheral matters of these cultural sites, surprising viewers with small-format close-ups and contrasting the accurately arranged main venues.

In his new series, Press ++, Thomas Ruff presents enormously magnified press images he acquired from various media archives. Whereas in the 1990s he approached the analog press image by presenting cropped and magnified newspaper photos, displaying their black grain and canceling their relationship to the accompanying text, in his new series Ruff now merges the original image with the editors’ caption, juxtaposing them as equal parts. Image, writing, choice of detail, and retouch are combined to an informative whole: recto and verso constitute a common aesthetic value.

Thomas Struth has been continually developing his technology cycle since 2007, in which he seeks out spaces for scientists and researchers that are usually closed to the public and confronts us with a world of tomorrow. The title of one of these works, AGLAE C2RMF, Paris 2013, may seem cryptic at first. It depicts an antique bronze sculpture that is controlled by a complexly wired device. Art history and modern technology converge in this piece: The scenery of the Louvre’s restoration workshop mirrors the technological progress that forces even the creative aspect of art to constantly prove itself anew.

On April 27, the Städel Museum in Frankfurt will arrange a comprehensive exhibition entitled Fotografien werden Bilder (Photographs Become Images). Candida Höfer’s pictures of the Elbphilharmonie are on view at the Deichtorhallen Hamburg until May 1. An exhibition that gives an overview of Thomas Struth’s work groups will open at the Haus der Kunst in Munich; the Whitechapel Gallery in London is planning a solo exhibition of Thomas Ruff’s works at the end of the year.

Galerieseite: Thomas Ruff, press++01.55, 2016, chromogener Abzug, 223 x 185 cm, © VG Bild - Kunst, Bonn 2017
Home, Reihung (Ausschnitt): Candida Höfer, Elbphilharmonie Hamburg Herzog & de Meuron Hamburg I 2016, C-Print, 180 x 197,9 cm © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017
Home, Slider (Ausschnitt): Thomas Struth, AGLAE, C2RMF, Paris, 2013, InkJet Print, 101,8 x 68,9 cm, © Thomas Struth

 
 

Judith Adelmann, Mickael Marman, Sophie Reinhold, Elif Saydam, Anina Troesch, Raphael Weilguni/Viola Relle

Judith Adelmann, Mickael Marman, Sophie Reinhold, Elif Saydam, Anina Troesch, Raphael Weilguni/Viola Relle

Gruppenausstellung

03.02.2017 - 01.04.2017
Raphael Weilguni / Viola Relle, Facebook
(o.T.), 2016
Porzellan, salzgebrannt
24 x 48 x 27 cm

Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle is pleased to present a group exhibition of young painters and sculptors featuring works by Judith Adelmann (DE), Mickael Marman (NO), Sophie Reinhold (DE), Elif Saydam (CAN), Anina Troesch (CH), and Raphael Weilguni / Viola Relle a.k.a. R-R (DE/HU).

Judith Adelmann sees her artistic practice as a process of investigating the interaction between visual and tactile things. Viewers are confronted with surfaces that cannot be allotted to specific materials and possess structurally contrasting features. By using different materials, Adelmann explores the complexities of the sensory body and questions expectations of the clichés of materiality and consistency. Along with her formal endeavors, the artist wants to create situations that visualize moments of pause and intervals of “nothing” and “vacuum” in transformational processes. Makeshift arrangements in the form of sculptures oscillate between dissolution and duration, their disappearance being already inherent. Judith Adelmann studies at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich in the class of Markus Karstieß – previously taught by Norbert Prangenberg.

Mickael Marman combines patterned fabrics with a spontaneous technique in the style of drip paintings. Colorful wax prints, popular in Western Africa, are placed as borders or diagonal components in relation and contrast to the lush, pastoral painterly elements. With them, Marman establishes a thematic connection to cultural identity and (post-)colonialism: The textiles that were produced as batik prints by the Dutch East India Company and others in Europe became popular in Western Africa in the nineteenth century and to this day symbolize status and wealth. In his works, Marman uses these textiles to reference both European market power – European colonial nations knew how to profit from their textile trade with Asia and Africa – and exoticism. To look at the fabrics today as typically African is to romanticize matters, since they were actually produced in Europe and then shipped overseas. Marman’s abstract works further reference artists from the American-European avant-garde and the influence of ethnic art on them. Mickael Marman studied at the University of Fine Arts Hamburg under Jutta Koether and at the Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main under Michael Krebber and Josef Strau.

Sophie Reinhold’s delicate works made from graphite, bitumen, marble, or other minerals deal with the fiction of naturalism. The artist understands the use of colors as a moment of personal presence, and not as a way to portray a situation, an external mood, or a place. Reinhold nips overly emotional, subjective expressions in the bud: By repeatedly applying glazing oil paint to sanded layers of marble dust and leveling the different materials with each other, the inherent emotional components and expressively charged gestures lose their footing, and only smooth surfaces revealing delicate color hazes remain. Reinhold contrasts the weightless diffusion with fragile yet clear structures of lines, bars, and waves. A deeply layered echo of painting remains tangible in the surfaces, captivating viewers much like immersing themselves in an icon would. Fleshing out the sublime and unrepresentable sentiment in painting is what the artist strives for in her work. Sophie Reinhold studied at the Weißensee Academy of Art Berlin under Antje Majewski and, previously, at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna under Amelie von Wulffen and at the Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst in Leipzig.

Elif Saydam’s oeuvre is informed by surrealist elements, abstract art, and cartoons – she works in the media of painting and text. Thematically, she explores the ascription of gender roles in society as influenced by social rituals and stereotypes. Motifs like a cowboy hat or a matador keep popping up in her works, which signify bravery and adventure and therefore indirectly inquire about the lack of female superheroes and adventurers. Using transparent nylon and chiffon as well as gold leaf, in turn, breaks with power symbols with masculine connotations. The artist is further interested in dealing with the creative process as something that lies between distraction and inspiration. She explores both the phase before actual artistic production and the idling moments during the work itself. Elif Saydam is a member of the artist and author collective Pure Fiction and studied under Monika Baer and Amy Sillman at the Städelschule in Frankfurt.

With her sculptures and large-scale installations, Anina Troesch brings together formal paradoxes such as hard and soft, excluding and accessible, threatening and comforting. She inserts a crafty aesthetic, laying no demand to consistency, clarity or narrative logic. Using the simplest of means, genres are combined in bold manners, resulting in a spatial collage of textiles and images. In this group exhibition Troesch shows a new sculptural work from 2016, “flag.” Troesch studied in the class of Judith Hopf at the Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main.

The ceramics of the young artist duo R-R feature cryptically amorphous forms – their sculptures include representations of organisms oscillating between natural and technical structures and elements of surrealistic constellations. Their motifs include masks, crowns, guardian figures, and sarcophagi and reveal a playful approach allowing for participation and reminding the beholder of Franz West’s “Adaptives” or works by the process artist Franz Erhard Walther. Raphael Weilguni and Viola Relle’s works captivate viewers by letting them feel experience material properties and aggregate states such as weight and rigidity as well as fragility and flexibility and by confronting them with the aesthetics of the incomplete. Their works often seem like found archeological objects and encourage viewers to ponder civilizational processes and cultural-anthropological matters such as that of humans as both cultural creators and creations of culture. With their “Hero” series, Weilguni and Relle consider promises that one has to take at face value for the time being and cannot immediately verify. Weilguni and Relle study at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich – Weilguni under Jean-Marc Bustamante; Relle studied under Norbert Prangenberg and Kerstin Brätsch and currently works in the class of Markus Karstieß.

 
 

Stephan Balkenhol

Stephan Balkenhol

03.02.2017 - 01.04.2017
Stephan Balkenhol
Mannn, 2016
Wawa Holz, Skulptur
185 x 45 x 45 cm
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017

Stephan Balkenhol is internationally renowned for his painted sculptures carved from large tree trunks with saws, chisels, and burins. Often created from one piece of wood, the figures appear as if they have grown out of their plinth and mesmerize the beholder with the artisanal virtuosity they embody. The human being is at the center of Balkenhol’s work. He confronts us with men and women the likes of whom we encounter every day, depicting them in a wide variety of poses and clothes and thus fascinate us with their subdued charm. Who hasn’t seen him, the “man in black pants and white shirt,” versions of whom you may bump into in heavily-trafficked public places such as museums as well as in the private sphere. Balkenhol’s figures are incredibly present; they emanate serenity and a sense of calm. Our eyes are strangely unable to meet their gazes; the figures appear introverted and contemplative, as if pondering their own existence or interrogating the beholder’s alter ego. In Balkenhol’s oeuvre, it is especially the hybrid sculptures, embodying the animalistic qualities of humans, that exert a particular appeal.
The artist’s preferred kind of wood is the large abachi trunk, imported from West Africa, which possesses a uniform structure and can have a diameter of up to two meters. But Balkenhol has also mastered the art of working with other types of wood like no one else, such as Lignum vitae, one of the densest woods in the world. Each work is based on a preliminary sketch. In an unmistakable, casual style, the contours and facial expressions are traced with only a handful of concise pen strokes. These ideas are then transferred to the third dimension on the block of wood, their rough structure first being sawed into the block and chipped away at in ever-smaller quantities, until finally the figures look at us in all their physicality and each splinter left on the surface has become part of the whole. It is not only wood that the artist uses: Many of his bronze sculptures can be found in public spaces—for instance in London, Paris, Hamburg, Salzburg, Frankfurt, Chicago, Amsterdam, and Berlin. Stephan Balkenhol’s creativity is truly one of a kind; the hours of his industrious contemplation of wood are the artist’s lifeblood. We are very excited to discover new humans and creatures by Balkenhol.

Stephan Balkenhol (born in Fritzlar in 1957; lives and works in Kassel, Meisenthal/Lorraine, Karlsruhe, and Berlin) is one of the most important contemporary German sculptors. From 1976 to 1982, he studied under Ulrich Rückriem at the Hamburg School of Fine Arts in and has been Professor of Sculpture at the Academy of Fine Arts in Karlsruhe since 1992. His works have been exhibited worldwide since 1983 in venues such as the Sprengel Museum Hannover (2003), the National Museum of Art in Osaka (2005), the Padiglione d’Arte Contemporanea in Milan (2007), the Deichtorhallen Hamburg (2008), the Museum of Grenoble (2010), the Landesmuseum Linz (2014), and the Moscow Museum of Modern Art (2016).

 
 

Karin Kneffel

Karin Kneffel

24.11.2016 - 28.01.2017
Karin Kneffel,
Ohne Titel, 2016
Öl auf Leinwand
180 x 240 cm
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016

Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle presents the artist Karin Kneffel’s most recent work cycle in a comprehensive solo exhibition, showing small- and medium-format oil paintings. The thematic focus is on the reinterpretation of “Betty” (1968) and “Candle” (1982), key works by Kneffel’s colleague and former professor at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, Gerhard Richter.
With these new works, Kneffel has created quotes of quotes. In its symbolism, Gerhard Richter’s “Candle” refers to Dutch vanitas still lifes from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and “Betty”—with its figure whose back of the head is turned to the viewer—refers to the work of the most important German Romantic painter, Caspar David Friedrich. With her reinterpretations, Kneffel manages to temporally and socially recontextualize the artistic impulse.
Transparent reflections, abstract color fields, and realistic depictions of condensed glass panes bearing traces of human presence and letting viewers experience “Betty” or “Candle” through them make the subjects oscillate between reality and fiction. The works evoke questions of the origin, history, and meaning of art per se.

Karin Kneffel was born in Marl, Germany, in 1957. From 1981 to 1987, she studied at the Kunstakademie in Düsseldorf. She has been working as a professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich since 2008. In 2015, her works were presented in two solo exhibitions: “Works on Paper” at the Kunsthalle Bremerhaven and “Case Studies” at the Käthe Kollwitz Museum in Cologne. In 2014, the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo Gas Natural Fenosa in La Coruña, Spain, dedicated another solo exhibition to her. In the same year, she showed her work at the Barcelona Pavilion in Spain. She lives and works in Düsseldorf.
 

Toulu Hassani

Toulu Hassani

common shift

09.09.2016 - 12.11.2016
With precise sensibility and a concept of resistance, Toulu Hassani probes the essentials and parameters of painting and its properties. Her initial interest lies in exploring and grasping structures and orders. In a second step, she breaks with the given dispositions and criteria and uses the primary material to generate detours, turning points, and deviations from the norm:
Arrangements, relations, and measurements routinely follow a pattern; they are organized in relation to the standards. A critique of standardizations places emphasis on the undefined and the potentially possible, on the not-yet-realized, the unexpected, and that which is not provided by the standard. Hassani acts in the same manner, expressing the unadjusted, the idiosyncratic, and contingencies in her work, thereby exploring the subject of unpredictability and randomness in a subtle way.
In this process, like in Persian miniature painting, patience, inspiration, a talent for drawing, and a sensibility for colors are important traits for Toulu Hassani to possess in order to create her works. The artist combines her unbiased approach to the patterning and textile peculiarities of the stretched canvas with delicate coloring, thus giving her material analyses a customized touch.
In Persian miniature painting, the poetic symbiosis of text, image, and lettering saw its heyday from the thirteenth century on. The images sought to attain the ideal harmony of arrangement, brushwork, and coloring. Hassani’s abstract works also tie in with these objectives. The lines in Timurid paintings, seemingly bleeding into infinity, reappear in Hassani’s work, and some of her works recall seemingly infinite representations of Earth and the cosmos. Additionally, the delicate interpretations of grids and structures are reminiscent of ancient lettering styles, such as the Sumerian cuneiform script.
Toulu Hassani was born in Iran and studied at the Braunschweig University of Art in Walter Dahn’s master class, among others. In 2014, she was a resident at the International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP) in New York and was amongst the “New Positions” at Art Cologne 2016. In late 2016, she will be awarded the Sprengel Prize for Fine Art of the Niedersächsische Sparkassenstiftung [Lower Saxony Savings Bank Foundation] within the framework of a solo exhibition at the Sprengel Museum Hannover.

Toulu Hassani
Ohne Titel, 2016
Öl und Feinminenstift auf Leinwand, 45 x 35 cm
© Toulu Hassani
 

Martin Creed

09.09.2016 - 12.11.2016
Martin Creed is known for his minimalist works and his approaches based on concept art. Rhythm, order, opposites, scales, everyday objects, and simple ideas are just as much subjects of his art as neon signs, films, music, and performances. Creed is at home in all media. He won the Turner Prize in 2001 for his “Work No. 227. The lights going on and off,” which was presented in the same year at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle’s space at Martiusstraße. At the Open Art 2016, Creed will present a wall painting in combination with a new group of works.
The mural is one of the earliest forms of artistic expression. From prehistory to the modern age, it has been one of the most important means of visual representation, but it is rarely seen in contemporary art. Martin Creed, who continues to surprise audiences with unexpected methods, has incorporated this neglected genre of painting in his repertoire. His expansive wall paintings are reduced to the simplest forms and colors. He thus analyzes and rigorously categorizes the fundamentals of painting in the painting itself.
Martin Creed has long engaged in the practice of creating his works on site at the gallery. His art should be perceived as not only a clearly defined concept but also as immediate and vivid. The performative aspect is frequently foregrounded; the body movements in the act of painting yield the forms of his new works. The movements of dancers, for instance, became images by way of paintbrushes attached to their feet. Postmodern practices from concept art and action art are always essential characteristics of Creed’s artistic production.
Martin creed was born in Wakefield, England, in 1968, and grew up in Glasgow. He lives and works in London. From 1986 to 1990, he studied at the Slade School of Fine Art in London. Solo exhibitions of his work have recently been presented at the Hayward Gallery in London (2014), the Tate Britain in London (2013), the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh (2013), the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (2012), the Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain in Nice (2011), and the Moscow Museum of Modern Art (2010). As an experienced musician, he has released several albums, including Mind Trap (2014), Chicago (2012) and Love to You (2012).

Martin Creed
Work No. 2132, 2015
Acryl auf Leinwand
40,2 x 30,2 cm
© Martin Creed
Courtesy Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle
 

Sonderschau

Sonderschau

01.07.2016 - 30.07.2016
In parallel with Flaka Halitis solo exhibition in July, Gallery Rüdiger Schöttle shows a special presentation with works by various artists of the gallery – starting with a screen print of a broken driving mirror by Jan Merta from the year of the turn of the millennium to a galvanized feather by Anders Clausen from the current year 2016: It is all about good luck and bad luck and other cosmic coincidences and conditions.

We are pleased to present in line with the group show works by Rodney Graham, Goshka Macuga, Thomas Struth, Florian Süssmayr and Thomas Zipp.

Click the following link to get an overview of the works from the years 2000 to 2016:
SHOWROOM GALERIE RÜDIGER SCHÖTTLE SONDERSCHAU JULI 2016

f.l.t.r.: Florian Süssmayr, Rote Sonne, Maximiliansplatz, 2008, oil on canvas, 90 x 75 cm | Slawomir Elsner, Aus der Serie A4 Blatt 133, 2014, crayon on paper, 29,7 x 21 cm | Jan Merta, Bud'te opatrní - Seid behutsam, 2000, silkscreen on paper, 50x 35 cm, edition of 21.
 

Flaka Haliti

Flaka Haliti

tea towels have something to do with tea

01.07.2016 - 30.07.2016
Flaka Haliti
My Gravity Slipped Away
installation view at SALTS Birsfelden
© Gunnar Meier Photography, courtesy SALTS and the Artist

For the first time Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle is presenting a solo exhibition by the Kosovar artist Flaka Haliti, who represented her home country at the 56th Venice Biennale last year. At least since then she is internationally known for her geopolitical explorations of national borders and the identities of unions such as the UN or the EU. At the Venice Biennale, she filled a room with blue sand and placed iron bar constructions in it that usually serve to reinforce the concrete elements of border walls. The room was flooded with light transitioning from white to yellow, red, pink and blue, twice a day in reference to the blue hour. With every colour the perception of the space changed completely; especially in the blue light the lines between the walls and the floor blurred and opened up the room into the infinite — an allusion to open national borders like those within the European Union and, at the same time, an affront to the Venice Biennale’s principle of exhibiting different nations.

In the exhibition „tea towels have something to do with tea“ at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, Flaka Haliti transfers the installation “My Gravity Slipped Away,” which was just shown at the project space SALTS in Birsfelden (CH), to the gallery space in Munich. A grey and white squared grid spans across the depth of the exhibition space in the form of a wallpaper — alluding to an empty Photoshop document. This “blank sheet” is populated by stained-glass stick-figures. Originally, these drawings were made by children from all over the world who attend an international school in Abidjan (Ivory Coast). Flaka Haliti transferred these drawings onto child-sized glass panels and has located them in this no man’s land. Visitors are now invited to walk on the surface to get in contact with these figures. This room-in-room situation merges the digital with the analogue world and thus creates a kind of neutral ground, which is transferable to any and all locations.

Flaka Haliti (b. 1982 in Prishtina, Kosovo) lives and works in Munich. She studied at the University of Prishtina and the Städelschule in Frankfurt. Currently she is participating at the PhD in Practice program at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. The artist is one of this year’s fellows at Villa Romana in Florence and was awarded with the Ars Viva Prize 2016. Flaka Haliti’s works have been shown at Kunsthalle Vienna, mumok Vienna, Kosovo National Gallery in Prishtina, Haus der Kulturen der Welt Berlin and at the 6th Moscow Biennale. Her work will be part of the exhibition FAVORITES III: New Art from Munich at the Lenbachhaus Munich this summer.

 

 
 

Alex Mirutziu

Alex Mirutziu

22.04.2016 - 25.06.2016
Alex Mirutziu
Wildt case #5, 2016
Bleistift auf Papier
28,3 x 21 cm

The oeuvre of the intermedia artist Alex Mirutziu includes photography, performance, sculpture, painting, graphic art, and video art. Mirutziu calls the recently deceased singer David Bowie one of his role models. And so, the young Romanian artist also routinely breaks with conventional representations of masculinity and femininity in his works. Mirutziu’s artistic language is closely related to the 'performative turn' and offers social interpretations and concepts of cultural change in the form of staged settings and the investigation of rituals. His approach goes beyond concepts of Body Art through questioning terms of 'Gestalt' or the 'Apparatus'.

In his most recent cycle, consisting of drawings and etchings, Mirutziu references the works of the Milan-based sculptor Adolfo Wildt (1868–1931). Wildt’s works are hard to describe in precisely defined artistic categories: At times they seem like works which draw on a quiet classicism but also owe a great deal to Art Nouveau and Symbolism, and in his self-portraits captured in moments of painful distress, Wildt is on the precipice of expressionism. Alex Mirutziu picks up on this visual language in his own works: The lines of his portraits are expressive and informed by a dramatically Mannerist mimicry. The pen strokes are nervous but resolute. Portraits take shape in the repeated continuations of lines which explore temporality, excitement, and changes of mental states. In addition to the works on paper, this solo exhibition shows Mirutziu’s sculptural works. Their fragile physicality and the integration of living plants touch on subject areas such as death, transience, creation, and transformation.

Alex Mirutziu describes his approach of drawing as follows:
„In my drawings I make use of jagged lines which I call 'bastard lines’ or 'homeless lines’. This method of drawing with lines do not follow the contour of things but entail a movement of an alien, almost uncanny hand. My hand doesn't account for the mind of what it should draw. I trained my hand to attack the paper and to create an instantaneous texture of lines and not to show the immediately apparent. My drawings are generated without any pretence of continuity. It is much more fetching to build a climate in drawing than representing the object or subject. I want to momentarily suspend meaning, to question closure even for a brief moment.“

Alex Mirutziu was born in 1981 in Sibiu, Romania. He lives and works in Romania and England and lectures at various European institutions such as the Royal College of Arts, London, the Von Krahl Theater in Tallinn, and the Konstfack University in Stockholm. Recent projects have been presented at the ZdB in Lisboa, The Power Plant in Toronto, Mücsarnok Budapest, the National Museum in Warsaw, and the Biennale di Venezia.
 

Jānis Avotiņš

Jānis Avotiņš

22.04.2016 - 25.06.2016
Jānis Avotiņš
Particular, Öl auf Leinwand
64 x 74 cm

Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle is once again pleased to present works by the Latvian artist Jānis Avotiņš. His new works show sublime sceneries of single passersby against architectural backdrops as well as groups of people which are reminiscent of historical newspaper coverage of political and social events. This work cycle is combined with paintings of figures in dancing poses. Avotiņš is known for his diffuse and mysterious paintings of human figures in indistinguishable spaces. The delicate apparitions of his figures adumbrate an ephemeral reality. Opaquely nebulous coloration immerses the subjects in an inaccessible calm, but at the same time the figures exhibit a striking presence. In peeling figures from their context and by way of metaphors of omission and void, Avotiņš reflects the mechanisms of cultural symbolic systems, collective symbolisms, and ideologies: The figures without their environmental context, and therefore without assignable milieus or functions, are thrown back on their own resources. Avotiņš’s artistic practice thus constantly reflects on subjective and objective constructions of reality as well as the disintegration and transformation of social structures and truths.

The Riga-based artist frequently applies paint in so fragile a manner and in such thinly glazed layers that the canvas structure is integrated into the image and thus amplifies the atmospheric effect of the paintings. Dark paint pigments that stick to the structure and therefore create a fine granulation on the surface are evocative of old photographs or newspaper images.

Like his whole oeuvre also Avotiņ'š new works reveal his constant interest in phenomenological questions about human consciousness. Moreover, several works display rebellious moods and motives. His representations of dance and movement stand for airiness and transcendence and embody precisely in connection with the more quiet and static motifs terms of dynamics, resistance and liberation.

Jānis Avotiņš describes his examination of historical images as follows:
“In my cultural location, where I grew up and where my imagination and intelligences where formed, there was no 'art', because all so called art was more or less the decorative addition to the ideology of communism. Art that was meant as art was never strong enough to me to be influential to my imagination. Much more stronger influence I got from the mass-media images, the characters, the banalities that were never meant to be poetic but 'informative'. However, it was not disgust in my childhood, it was just there. I do look at these images in a naive mode. I see the power of these images, the other possible potential of them. Most of these images were printed and the print quality itself used to be mostly bad and thus poetic, unclear and somehow mythological for an innocent mind.”

Jānis Avotiņš was born in Latvia and studied at the Art Academy of Latvia. Domestically and internationally, he has been represented in many solo and group exhibitions. At the moment, works by Jānis Avotiņš are shown at the Parisian Palais de Tokyo within the framework of his nomination for the Prix Jean-François Prat.

 

 

 

 
 

Anders Clausen

Anders Clausen

-<<<<< ===========+

19.02.2016 - 16.04.2016
Anders Clausen, Untitled (Urmeter X-Profile), 2015, brass, 2,5 x 100 x 2,5 cm.

Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle is proud to present its fourth solo exhibition of the Danish artist Anders Clausen, whose oeuvre examines the principles of consumer societies and mass production as well as the digital age and the way in which it has altered our everyday behaviors. In his current works, the artist explores several examples of evolution technology and globalization phenomena. The exhibition consists of two work groups: reproductions of the standard meter bars and bird feathers, which have been treated and manipulated to varying degrees.
The standard meter dates back to an invention in eighteenth-century France, and was the equivalent of one ten-millionth of the distance between the North Pole and the equator via Paris. Anders Clausen explores the origins of this length unit that today we take for granted. He created reproductions of the prototype meter from aluminum, brass, and plastic. The meter bars in the exhibition room have an x-shaped cross section and are modeled after the second prototype of the standard meter from 1867, a bar made of platinum-iridium. Replications of that were installed in public places in the city of Paris to give citizens free access to, and thus familiarize them with, the new measurement. The definition of this meter has since been revised several times and adjusted to scientific developments.
Similarly, in the study of birds, the first known feather dates back to the Archaeopteryx from the Late Jurassic epoch. Since its excavation in the nineteenth century, the fossil serves as the basis for ornithological evolutionary research. Insights about the properties of feathers and the origin of the biological class of birds (Aves) have constantly changed based on new research and international fossil finds. Originally, Anders Clausen used pennaceous feathers from various bird species (e.g. eagle, turkey) to render pearlescent, completely novel feather compositions complex techniques such as water print, galvanisation, aerosol paint and paper cutting. The artificial colors and forms stand in contrast to the natural function of feathers for the birds themselves.
Anders Clausen’s new works are subtle references to occurrences that today we take for granted. They remind us of how flexible an existing system can, and must, be. As the mathematician Kristin Shaw noted, the international standard meter maybe was for eighteenth-century Parisians what internet is for us today. We have become dependent on its functionality and existence, but, originally, it was designed by scientists to exchange data.

Anders Clausen (born 1978 in Copenhagen) lives and works in Berlin. He studied at the Royal College of Art in London. His most recent works were featured at “Between Bridges” in Berlin in 2015 and in the exhibition “A Perfect Match” on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of PIN. Friends of the Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich.

 
 

Candida Höfer

Candida Höfer

Libraries

19.02.2016 - 16.04.2016
Candida Höfer, Benediktinerstift Admont III 2014, C-Print, 180 x 200.4 cm
copyright: Candida Höfer, Cologne / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2016.

For over 30 years Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle has enjoyed a close relationship with Candida Höfer. The artist is known for her objective, focused portrayal of cultural sites such as opera houses, churches, palaces, and libraries.
In this year’s solo exhibition, we are excited to present her latest photographs of Late Baroque monastic libraries in Austria, marking the first time these photographs are shown in Germany. The idea to include these libraries in her oeuvre was born two years ago during Candida Höfer’s exhibition “Düsseldorf” at the Landesgalerie Linz in Upper Austria. In a typical manner, the new images show spaces of knowledge and education, halls that are representative of earthly and heavenly power, devoid of people and from the central perspective. Viewing these large-format works not only lets one experience the colorful and dynamic interplay of architecture, sculpture and painting or the theatrical distribution of light in the Baroque period, but also captures, in a quasi-allegorical image, the source of knowledge on which our contemporary view of the world is based.
The monastic libraries photographed by Candida Höfer count among the most important cultural heritage sites of Late Baroque art and architecture. They house early manuscripts, incunabula, bibles, and an inventory of books arranged according to scientific subject matter. The Enlightenment concept of embracing education and science also comes to bear in the library’s décor. The ceiling frescos of Bartolomeo Altomonte, for instance, which are found in the library halls of Admont Abbey and St. Florian Monastery, depict the stages of human knowledge from thought and speech to the sciences and divine revelation. The triumphal ceiling frescos at Melk Abbey and Altenburg Abbey, created by the renowned Austrian painter Paul Troger, also illustrate the marriage of virtue and science under the auspices of religion. Altenburg even has a crypt underneath its library, which in this case serves purely as a place of meditation about death. The wall paintings were made by students of Paul Troger, who adhered to an unconventional iconography of death, resulting in a unique example of grotesque Baroque art. With her monumental photographs, Candida Höfer reminds viewers of these comprehensive works of art, and transfers them into a contemporary medium.

Candida Höfer (born 1944 in Eberswalde) counts among the most important members of the Düsseldorfer Fotoschule. She studied under Bernd and Hilla Becher at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf from 1976 to 1982. Her works are exhibited internationally and today are part of some of the most important collections worldwide.
 

Thomas Struth

Thomas Struth

12.11.2015 - 30.01.2016
Thomas Struth
Research Vehicle, Armstrong Flight Research Center, Edwards 2014
Inkjet print
145,8 x 196,7 cm
© Thomas Struth, courtesy Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle

Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle is pleased to present the new cycle of German artist Thomas Struth, who has been affiliated with us since the 1980s.
On his trip to South Korea in 2007, Thomas Struth photographed tankers under repair in one of the world's largest shipyards and a semi-submersible drilling rig. Since this trip, industrial innovation and scientific achievements have been the center of the artist's attention.
The works on view on the gallery’s ground and first floors give visitors insight into the inner workings of these facilities, their machines and contraptions, and the frequently inaccessible spaces of scientific research, as the artist places his focus on medical institutions and test laboratories with their instruments and equipment.
The work "Research Vehicle, Armstrong Flight Research Center, Edwards, 2014" shows a simulator that the Apollo astronauts used from 1964 onwards to practice the moon landing. Only the titles of the works hint at the origin and the function of the images’ objects. Without any human presence as witness and indication of space and time, a categorization of the content in terms of past, present and future is not instantly possible. Entwined hoses, tangled cables, inexplicable constructions in rich colors emerge and transform into abstract compositions of color and form. Similar to his early streetscapes and photographs of forests and jungles, the new cycle also confronts the otherwise disconnected human being with the image.
Thomas Struth, born 1954 in Geldern, Germany, counts among the most important artists of his generation. His architectural photographs, in both black-and-white and color, of cities in Europe, the United States, and Asia as well as his well-known family portraits, in which he challenges the possibility of photography as the origin of psychological research, are cornerstones in the artist's oeuvre. Struth went on to produce strongly analytical museum photographs that probe the relationship between visitor, museum, and artwork, and the "Paradise", his forest and jungle photographs. The works of Thomas Struth have been featured in numerous international solo exhibitions. In 2016, both the Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin and the Folkwang Museum in Essen will arrange solo exhibitions with the new group of works, which will subsequently travel to several museums in the United States.
 

David Claerbout

David Claerbout

11.09.2015 - 07.11.2015
David Claerbout
Highway Wreck, 2013
15 min 35 sec loop
single channel video, HD animation, black & white, silent
© David Claerbout, courtesy Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle

On the occasion of the 2015 Open Art Munich, Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle showcases two works of the internationally renowned Belgian video artist David Claerbout. In an environment he has developed specifically for the exhibition, Clearbout presents the audiovisual installation "Radio Piece (Hong Kong)" and the video installation "Highway Wreck," both of which examine the concepts of time and space.

David Claerbout, born in 1969 in Kortrijk, Belgium, originally studied painting. It was only later, with his own growing interest in collecting, that he found his way to photography and film. He examines the perception and significance of both media technologically and thematically with regard to our increasingly digitalized world. Claerbout adds reconstructed images and his own films to found, partially historical, images, sets images in motion and decelerates them. His works often act as screens onto which banal everyday events or moments are projected, which by way of digital processing open up narrative spaces whose end is yet uncertain. This allows the viewers to perceive the depicted moment not in filmic time, but almost as the experience of a physical space. The captured moment can be seen as an allegory of life.

The audiovisual installation "Radio Piece (Hong Kong)" from 2015 – a collaboration with RAY Fotografieprojekte Frankfurt/RheinMain – begins with the image of a Zen garden, which in the next progression turns out to be a picture in a small chaotic room. The camera gradually tracks away from this room until only the facades of Hong Kong's notorious Kowloon Walled City are visible; a district on the Kowloon peninsula, which in 1987 had the world's largest population density. For a long time, its legal status was unclear until it was eventually torn down in 1993/1994.

These visuals are accompanied by binaural audio recordings. The audio recordings, whose playback via headphones ensures a realistic and spatial listening experience, were created with the help of an artificial head, which has microphones stuck in its ears. For this work, Claerbout used the ambient sounds surrounding the video's protagonist, a young man.

"Radio Piece (Hong Kong)" quickly engrosses the visitors with a coherent image and sound quality, but the circumstances of the scenery gradually sink in. The video implies the housing shortage, the struggle for affordable living, and the way in which business flourishes under these conditions. The audio recordings quite literally also encompass the space. According to Claerbout, the attitude that real spaces and resources become scarcer can in turn become a market of mental real estate, located between the ears. The video projection "Highway Wreck" from 2013 is based on a more than seventy-year-old black and white photograph showing some children and a soldier who are intrigued by the wreckage of a recent car crash. By adding images of laborers and onlookers, Claerbout condensed the photograph to a moment from which its original urgency has become detached and the spectacle thus has been disarmed.

David Claerbout is one of the most important and renowned video artists of his generation. His works are internationally celebrated with numerous solo exhibitions. Until September 13, 2015, the Mamco in Geneva is showcasing Claerbout's work in a retrospective entitled "David Claerbout. Performed Pictures".

 

 
 

Painting Show – Part Two

Painting Show – Part Two

11.09.2015 - 07.11.2015
Thomas Zipp
Beyond Conventional Limitations (Fechner), 2015
Öl auf Leinwand
105 x 125 cm
In Part Two of the Painting Show, Rüdiger Schöttle presents works by Thomas Helbig (DE), Ma Ke (CN), Karin Kneffel (DE), Andrew Palmer (GB), Qiu Ruixiang (CN), and Thomas Zipp (DE). Part One featured works by Helene Appel (DE), Jānis Avotiņš (LT), Adrian Ghenie (RO), Toulu Hassani (IR), Kour Pour (GB), and Florian Süssmayr (DE).
In Thomas Helbig’s most recent works, immaterial traces of jewelry, decorative chains, and cosmic motifs light up against the dark background of the medium, much like in photograms. Helbig uses colorful stage fabrics as carrier material. In contrast to a canvas, the surface swallows the light that hits it, or reflects it as a soft gleam. The visibility of the golden selvage reinforces the solemn appearance of the fabric and, at the same time, undermines its pathos in a subtle way. Its deceptive backlighting, in which the fragile negative forms take shape, are owed to the paint mist left by previous spraying activity. The thing in itself has disappeared; what viewers perceive is an afterglow. This reversal of painting acts as a form of trickery, and Helbig raises the medium’s question of presentation and representation in a hybrid play of material and color application. Thomas Helbig studied at the Academy of Fine Arts Munich and at Goldsmiths, University of London. He lives and works in Berlin.

At the center of Ma Ke’s work, one often finds the human form placed in seemingly surreal settings. In distorted representational forms, it assumes a strong presence in the picture: The bodies are frequently stretched vertically, and at times the heads are equipped with unnaturally high foreheads. Time and again, Ma Ke’s characters seem to tamper with strange gadgets, some of which, conversely, seem to be connected to the body. Are the blocks Ma Ke shows attached to a figure’s leg the McLuhanian machines of the electronic age? The media theoretician Marshall McLuhan views media as extensions of the human sensory apparatus, but also as amputations thereof. In his theories, he queries how mediality changes human beings and, with them, society, and how it thus directly determines human thought, action, and perception. Ma Ke was also heavily influenced by Chinese media policies and social practices in China. In the beginning, his work was informed by traditional Chinese oil paintings and socialist realism, until he developed a wholly new way of perceiving at the Art Academy of Tianjin, liberated himself from restrictions, and found his way to his own artistic language. He received his MFA at the Central Academy of Fine Arts (CAFA) in Beijing. Ma Ke was born in Zibo in the Shandong province. He lives and works in Beijing.

With her realistic paintings, Karin Kneffel captures a broad spectrum of subjects, which she approaches with a consistent distance and representational precision. Since the early 2000s, interiors and window pictures are two of the main focuses of her oeuvre. The reflections in polished floors, shimmering furniture, flat glass panels, television screens, or paintings within the painting create picture puzzles about recognizing interiors and exteriors, foregrounds and backgrounds, and past and present things. Kneffel transfers everything on the two-dimensional plane of the canvas, and freezes space and time in a single moment. Her expert use of lighting effects supports the undefinable nature and the mysterious atmosphere of her scenarios. They appear flash-frozen and are often reminiscent of stills from a film by David Lynch. Kneffel repeatedly uses the element of water, which sits on window panes in the form of droplets or rivulets and through which entire image spaces are revealed to the viewers. Sometimes colors and prop surfaces blaze up in the water spots. With this device, Kneffel’s style of painting often shifts into the abstract. Karin Kneffel was a student in Gerhard Richter’s master class and is a professor of painting at the Academy of Fine Arts, Munich.

Andrew Palmer’s abstract geometrical paintings resemble those of Thomas Helbig in their visual language. Much like in Helbig’s works, the meandering, undefinable surfaces and lines of Palmer’s paintings are often reminiscent of macrocosmic structures or conjure up microscopic images or geological formations. Symbolic places and worlds with ramified pathways emerge, which may either lie within us or outside, at a great distance from us. Geometric, seemingly weightless figures appear, while the image background shows through their transparent bodies. Foreground and background, the concrete and the abstract topple into each other. Palmer applies his material – oil paint, acrylic primer, varnish – not only to the canvas, but also to found rocks. The painted areas give the illusion of the rock formations’ smooth, polished surfaces with their shimmering color spots and veining. They are a contrast to the rough, untouched areas on the rocks. Palmer copies forms and surface structures from nature and virtually competes with them in his paintings and objects. “Art is embedded in nature,” as Albrecht Dürer already knew, and Hackel’s Art Forms in Nature were already popular among artists at the previous turn of the century. Andrew Palmer was born in Salisbury, UK, and received his art diploma from the Slade School of Fine Art. He lives and works in London.

Qiu Ruixiang places the human form at the center of his work, much like his Chinese colleague Ma Ke. His protagonists appear to be immersed either in manual labor or in meditative physical exercise such as qigong, a Chinese system of concentration and movement used to train body and mind. The figures always emerge from a dark background of different colors, and are dramatically brought to life with a potent light source, which accentuates them from their surrounding and enhances the expression of their inner tensions. The characters are regularly alone as they are lost in their activities and, in their quiet emotionality, seem distant from the outside world. This effect is reinforced by a top view, which the artist sporadically uses and where, in a figurative sense, an omniscient narrator observes from above and from a distance. Ruixiang’s figures emanate a contemplative, introverted aura. His works captivate viewers by their distinction from overly contemporary works and by their celebration of unobtrusive colorfulness and tranquility. Qiu Ruixiang studied at the Xi’an Academy of Fine Arts. He was born in Shanxi and lives and works in Xi’an.

Thomas Zipp explores artistic, scientific, religious, and social utopias in his works, and in doing so discusses their hopes and promises as well as their failures. In expressing his associations, he uses not only the means of painting, but also frequently those of sketching, photography, photocopying, sculpture, and object work. He prefers to assemble the various media in programmatically space-filling installations. Moreover, Thomas Zipp also actively engages in music and text production. His “narrative conceptualism” draws on a plethora of stylistic means. Therefore, his works may be interpreted at times as ironic and humorous, at times as poetic and sensual, and even somber and melancholic. The representation of the conceptual plays an essential role in Zipp’s paintings, distinguishing his paintings from loud, colorful pop paintings. Time and again, these concepts revolve around the themes of body and spirit, norm and deviation, the unconscious and the visionary. Psychological concepts, theories and research about the history of psychiatry à la Michel Foucault are Zipp’s preferred topics of interest. His examination of historic art movements such as cubism, futurism, and surrealism is always tangible in his works. Thomas Zipp studied at the Städelschule in Frankfurt and at the Slade School of Fine Arts in London. He is professor of painting and multimedia at the Berlin University of the Arts.
 
 

Painting Show Part One

Painting Show Part One

12.06.2015 - 31.07.2015
Kour Pour
Chanting, Humming all day long, 2014
acrylic on canvas over panel
244 x 183 cm

Helene Appel
Jānis Avotinš
Adrian Ghenie
Toulu Hassani
Kour Pour
Florian Süssmayr

Part One of the Painting Show at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle exhibits the works of six artists: Helene Appel (DE), Jānis Avotiņš (LT), Adrian Ghenie (RO), Toulu Hassani (IR), Kour Pour (GB), and Florian Süssmayr (DE). The works of Helene Appel, Toulu Hassani, and Kour Pour are illusionistic in their visual language and those of Appel and Hassani are characterized to a great extent by clarity and objectivity, whereas Adrian Ghenie’s works display a markedly gestural, expressive tendency. Jānis Avotiņš’s figural paintings are distinguished by their diffuse and reduced rendition and those of Florian Süssmayr by their photorealist technique as well as their subjects’ transformation in various carrier materials.

Jānis Avotiņš, a longtime affiliate of Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, has honed his distinctive style with his subtle and poetic paintings and restrained chromaticity. His human shapes and faces emerge from diffuse, often obfuscated backdrops, which alienate the figures from space and time, and give them a haunting, somewhat uncanny aura. This effect is reinforced by the high light-and-dark contrasts he frequently uses. Avotiņš covers the tracks of his figures’ pasts and identities, and, in doing so, references movements such as constructivism and structuralism. By peeling subjects out of their contexts, Avotiņš reflects on the mechanisms of the systems of cultural symbols, collective symbolisms, or ideologies: As they are not embedded in their surroundings and, consequently, their assignable milieus or functions, the figures are left to their own devices. Born in Latvia, Jānis Avotinš lives in Riga. He received his art education in Riga, Manchester, and Paris.

The works of the young artist Toulu Hassani examine the objecthood, materiality, and surface qualities of painting and its accessories. Hassani creates her works employing an intricate mixing technique and with great precision, and thereby lures the viewer into the trap of illusionism. Viewers never know exactly what they are dealing with. At times, one assumes to make out the canvas frame showing through, at others, one believes to be looking at the rough, untreated texture’s wear and tear. With her delicate coloring, Hassani always gives her – only seemingly objective – material analysis a personal touch. Incidentally, the works therefore also reference movements such as Color Field Painting or they reinterpret Minimalism. Hassani understands the canvas as both her accomplice and adversary, and plays with the patterns and properties she finds in the various materials of a stretched canvas. Toulu Hassani studied in Braunschweig and Valencia and attended the master class of Walter Dahn. She is the winner of the 2013 Preis des Kunstvereins Hannover and, in 2014, received a scholarship for the International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP) in New York.

Helene Appel is also a master of questioning reality. She paints deceptively real-looking chopped vegetables, grains of rice, thin fishnet threads, dirty puddles, and pencil peels. The artist always sources her subjects from everyday life, from the nondescript, from that which receives little attention. Appel approaches these objects with calm, care, and mindfulness; she demonstrates great reverence by not pretending to deconstruct or outplay their peculiarities and by abstracting her own expressiveness from the work process. The finely painted lines of the nets, the puddles of synthetic resin, and the other subjects always correspond to the sizes of the real objects. With great care and patience, Appel renders her materials and individual parts into groups to form a whole. The repetition and arrangement of the individual parts create dynamic formations and thereby illustrate the power of the collective. Born in Karlsruhe, the artist studied in Hamburg and London, and has exhibited her works all over the world. She lives and works in Berlin.

Kour Pour’s practice can be categorized as related to Toulu Hassani’s and Helene Appel’s oeuvre. Like these two painters, the young artist from England with Iranian roots is interested in realistic depictions. He finds his subjects primarily in the ornamental aesthetic and fantastic repertoire of figures of Ancient Persian carpets. However, Pour is not only interested in reproducing the formal beauty of these pieces of art-historically significant human craftsmanship, but also in concentrating, collaging, and remixing old patterns and circulating these images by means of modern technology. Therefore, illustrations of his works can be found next to antique carpets with corresponding image content in auction catalogues or online. Pour plays with this phenomenon as well as with the increasing conflation and juxtaposition of high culture, subculture, and commercial art. Thus, some of the Old Persian figures and mythical creatures or insignias of power and belief today are used as clipart images for illustrative purposes. Kour Pour lives and works in Los Angeles, where he also attended the Otis College of Art and Design.

In contrast to Hassani, Appel, and Pour, Adrian Ghenie’s works are usually categorized as gestural paintings. His works range between figural and abstract forms of representation, in that individual figurative image sections are often smudged or superimposed with blotches and spots. Ghenie examines historical figures from the fields of science, art, and politics, and creates settings that tend to evoke a bleak mood. His recurring motifs are interiors furnished with large chairs, sometimes showing his figures seated, pausing, and pondering. In other situations, they stand in a space, gesturing histrionically, covering their face with their hands, or seem to be about to pull their hair out. Time and again, the faces are rendered unrecognizable. Other accessories in these interiors recall the aesthetic of Communist Romania, where Ghenie grew up. Ghenie represents Romania at this year’s Venice Biennale. He was born in Baie Mare, studied art at the University of Art and Design Cluj-Napoca (UAD), and lives and works in Cluj and Berlin.

Florian Süssmayr’s works are a testament to his great artistic skill. His photorealistic paintings are mainly made up of shades of brown, gray, and black, and feature snapshot-like subjects from the punk and rock music scenes, the milieu of Bavarian bars and taverns, or everyday phenomena. By consistently using sepia tones, the subjects seem to date from a more recent past. They carry traces of a “rebel youth,” which Florian Süssmayr can look back on just as much as his fellow painters Daniel Richter or Albert Oehlen. The various subjects and materials undergo a transformation and rearrangement in Süssmayr: A photograph becomes a painting, which is in turn photographed, photocopied, or printed as wallpaper, and thus becomes a background for new images. Another characteristic of Süssmayr’s work is his use of text, which appears in the form of logos, album cover titles, and manifesto-like aphorisms. References to the works of fellow artists, well-known locations, motifs, and people can be found everywhere in Süssmayr’s comprehensive oeuvre. Florian Süssmayr lives in Munich; he worked as a musician and has been working in the motion picture industry for some time.

In Part Two of the Painting Show, which opens September 11, 2015, Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle will exhibit works by Thomas Helbig (DE), Ma Ke (CN), Karin Kneffel (DE), Andrew Palmer (GB), Qiu Ruixiang (CN), and Thomas Zipp (DE).
 

Thomas Ruff

Thomas Ruff

17.04.2015 - 06.06.2015
neg◊nus_15, 2014, chromogenic print, 71 x 61 cm
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015

Thomas Ruff is one of the internationally most renowned photographers. One is immediately captivated by the original prints of his photographs, which have always been subject to technological advancements. Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle presents two series that reference one of the oldest genres of the arts: nudes.
Propelled by his curiosity and his conceptual photography practice, the scholarly artist Thomas Ruff has always created something new in each of his series.
In his series of “nudes,” Thomas Ruff takes on the classical subject of the female nude for the first time in his career. Upon considering how a nude photograph might look in his own artistic mode of expression, Thomas Ruff conducted research in the then rather novel internet, eventually stumbling upon pornographic websites with low-resolution images. His first “nude” was inspired by his interest in the structure of these digital images and in processing the pixel structures. Today, his “nudes” are well-known all over the world – and Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle presents various examples and forms of his digital nude photography in this exhibition. Thomas Ruff is renowned for constantly developing original methods and expanding traditional concepts of photography. His most recent series, “Negatives,” is no different. In it, he references the beginnings of the medium using photographs from the nineteenth century. Consisting solely of shades of blue, the new set of works recalls the cyanotype – a technique for producing photographs made famous by the natural scientist Anna Atkins, who used it to make a precise record of various plants. Pictures of artists’ studios, portraits, and nudes were some of the key visuals on the historical nineteenth-century photographs Thomas Ruff acquired. He scanned these old photographs, digitally inverted the color scale, and created blue-tinted photographs in the size of the original negatives.
In contrast to his “nudes,” the nude images in “Negatives” are marked by a wonderful historical aesthetic. Thomas Ruff had the idea for “Negatives” while working on modified types of photograms. Using high-performance computers, he virtualized and developed historical photogram techniques, viewing the images alternately as positives and negatives. In the inversion process, the “Negatives” produce wholly new compositions with new light/dark values which achieve completely different depth effects, heighten the plasticity, and thus allow for a new visual experience. With the title “Negatives,” Thomas Ruff calls attention to the elimination of negatives in a digitalized world, whose younger generations rarely encounter negatives as a precursor to photography anymore.
 

Stephan Balkenhol

Stephan Balkenhol

17.04.2015 - 06.06.2015
Accident (Relief und halbnackter Mann), 2013,
Wawa Holz, Skulptur 170 x 24,5 x 24,5 cm / Relief 100 x 139 cm
© VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015, Foto: Wilfried Petzi

57 penguins carved from abachi wood constituted one of the works Stephan Balkenhol exhibited at the Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt/Main in 1991. Visitors were thrilled by this colony of penguins that presented itself in a variety of poses: squatting, standing up, lying down, breeding, running, swimming. At first glance, the sculptures carved from a single block of wood appear simple in their choice of subject, and yet they bespeak not only the virtuosity of the artist’s craft, but also his constant questioning of human existence. After all, human beings have been at the center of Stephen Balkenhol’s art for more than thirty years. Along with the by now numerous carved “human penguins” – men in white shirts and black pants – which greatly outnumber the Frankfurt penguins in quantity and variation, Stephan Balkenhol also explores the subject of man and woman, which was exemplified in no uncertain terms in his most recent, comprehensive, retrospective at the Landesmuseum in Linz, Austria: A red fan construction shows a man on one side and only by walking around the fan, the onlooker sees a woman depicted on the other side – both paradisiacally naked. Close-by, a “Hermaphrodite” (2013) writhes prettily on a wooden board and a “Satyr” (2014) relaxes in an erotic pose emulating the famed Barberini Faun. A nude man dressed only in a brown jacket and covering his face stands in front of a relief which, much like a cave painting, recalls the origins of human artistry.

Stephan Balkenhol has also created numerous public bronze sculptures, and, quite often, ordinary people are at the center of his attention. A bronze Balkenhol man in a white shirt and black pants balances on a wall – as a memorable symbol of the German Wende – near the former Todesstreifen (death strip) of the Berlin Wall (“Balancing Act,” 2009). For Balkenhol, even a young Richard Wagner in Leipzig (2013) is first and foremost a human being; only the sculpture’s 13-foot shadow attests to the composer’s creative power. And a sculpture of the resistance fighter Jean Moulin in Metz (2014) simply shows the man without any sign of pathos.
Stephan Balkenhol stands firmly in the tradition of wood carvers and manages like no other in this medium to give new expression to human existence. His sculptures are at times gentle and made of hard wood, at times coarse and made of rather soft wood, and almost all of them consist of one single piece of wood. First, the sculptures are sawed from the woodblocks with chainsaws and are then peeled out with great precision with chisels and burins. Finally, the figures are painted. Despite their rough surface structure with protruding splinters, they are incredibly precise sculptures in human form.
One is immediately captivated by these figures that were virtually coaxed out of wood, and always stands before them in fascination. Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle will not show any penguins in the upcoming exhibition, but we are very excited about the new works of Stephan Balkenhol.
 

Rodney Graham

Rodney Graham

06.02.2015 - 11.04.2015
Rodney Graham, untitled (no. 1-12), 2014, ink (with pipe cleaners and traditional brushes) on watercolour paper, 37,7 x 27,5 cm, © Rodney Graham, courtesy Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle.

Rodney Graham counts among the most important conceptual artists of our time. He is renowned for his humorous, self-reflexive and narrative works, in which he puts himself in relation to literature, music, film, and icons from art history in various roles.
The exhibition Kitchen Magic Drawings at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle shows new works by Rodney Graham in the role of the “pipe cleaner artist,” a concept he has been pursuing since 2013. Rüdiger Schöttle’s new book KITCHEN MAGIC provided the inspiration for these intensely colorful and mysterious drawings. The text is based on ideas of Theodor W. Adorno and Jacques Derrida; the kitchen serves as a metaphor and space for Rüdiger Schöttle’s thoughts on temporality, perception and the connection of subject and object.

Rodney Graham: “I tried to respond to Rüdiger’s very abstract text in the persona of the ‘pipe cleaner artist,’ an imaginary artist working in the 1960s, who explores the expressive potential of bent, twisted, paint-dipped pipe cleaners (somewhat in the tradition of Cocteau, who, in a photograph by Man Ray, is seen fabricating a pipe cleaner head – such as the one seen in Blood of a Poet). I did two series of drawings, one in black and white, and executed with pipe cleaners dipped in India ink, and a second series in color executed with pipe cleaners as well as traditional brushes. Both Kitchen Magic series attempt to find a resonance with Rüdiger’s text by evoking unconscious images of transformation through an essentially automatist approach.”

In addition to the drawing, this exhibition shows assemblages, which are also made of pipe cleaners and reveal another facet of the “pipe cleaner artist.” Without any fixation on one single medium, Rodney Graham uses this role to amalgamate with one another the real and the fictional figure of the artist.

Rodney Graham (born in 1949 in Vancouver, Canada), lives and works in Vancouver. His works are part of some of the most important collections around the world, and have been part of international exhibitions since the 1980s. In late 2015, the Sammlung Goetz in Munich will dedicate a solo exhibition to the artist.

Forthcoming in spring 2015 at Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, Cologne: RÜDIGER SCHÖTTLE: KÜCHENZAUBER / KITCHEN MAGIC.  With 12 color drawings by Rodney Graham.

 
 

Chen Wei

Chen Wei

Yesterday Shop

06.02.2015 - 11.04.2015
Chen Wei, In The Waves #6, 2013, Archival Inkjet Print, 180 x 225 cm
© Chen Wei, courtesy Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle and Chen Wei.

Yesterday Shop is the second solo exhibition of Chinese photo artist Chen Wei, presented by Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle.
Several staged color photographs of various formats are on view. Painting, photography and film serve Chen Wei as sources of inspiration and echo in his choice of motifs, compositions, and the coloring and lighting of his works.

As one enters the exhibition space on the first floor of the gallery, one encounters a group of people dancing, suffused with blue light, absorbed in the moment. The location itself is not discernible; merely a few light cones traverse the space and suggest a dance club. Chen Wei commented on this work, titled “In the Waves #6,” in an interview with the British newspaper The Guardian: “In China, nightclubs are the only places where large numbers of people are allowed to get together. Gatherings of people all doing the same thing would never be permitted anywhere else – certainly not on the street. It would make the government nervous. This was taken in Beijing, where I live, last year. It’s about dreams and reality: people in China go out clubbing to chase their dreams, but they can’t escape from what’s happening outside …” (The Guardian, April 30, 2014, interview by Karin Andreasson).

Chen Wei’s works examine current social issues. With brutal honesty, he brings our living conditions, dreams, desires, and fears into sharper focus. After careful preparations, and with the help of a select group of assistants, he produces his works on film stages or in his studio. He stages still lifes, empty interiors, or entire deserted strip malls reminiscent, in composition and choice of motifs, of Edward Hopper’s works.
“In the Waves #6” is a special exception to the other works in the exhibition, as there are protagonists who inhabit his often deserted backdrops. Panning the exhibition, however, one cannot help but notice that the other works always bear witness to human presence as well, while the people in “In the Waves #6” almost seem like accessories.

Chen Wei was born in 1980 in the Zhejiang Province in China. He lives and works in Beijing. 2015: His works are part of the group exhibition of contemporary Chinese photography opening in May 2015 at the Museum Folkwang in Essen. In March 2015, his photographs will be on view in a solo exhibition at the K11 Art Space in Shanghai. In 2014, he exhibited his works at the Australia China Art Foundation in Sidney and participated in the following group exhibitions: Chinese Photography 1911–2014 at the Stravanger Art Museum, Stravanger, Norway; My Generation: Young Chinese Artists at the Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa, Florida, and at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg. His works are represented in numerous international collections.

 

 

 

 

 
 

Elger Esser

Elger Esser

14.11.2014 - 31.01.2015
Elger Esser
Ninfa – Physadeia, 2013
Unikat, Directprint, AluDibond, Shellac
98 x 123 x 4,5 cm, © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014

"Only by way of a nymph does nature become landscape." - Elger Esser
Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle is proud to present the fifth solo exhibition of German photographer Elger Esser. On view are works from his most recent series of landscape photographs, entitled Ninfa (“nymph”), which were created in the eponymous Italian Giardino di Ninfa, south of Rome.
As the area is particularly well protected at the foot of the Lepini Mountains and at the head of the river Ninfa, an ecosystem with a unique flora and fauna, the origins of which date from Ancient Rome, was able to develop there. Its urban structures were abandoned due to the plague and various crusades in the Middle Ages, and were reconquered by nature. In the 16th century, the aristocratic family of Caetani commissioned the construction of an English Garden around this fertile landscape of ruins. For centuries, the enchanted Giardino di Ninfa has attracted artists, literati and poets – among them Giorgio Vasari, Virginia Woolf, and Gabriele D’Annunzio.
In his examination of Ninfa, Elger Esser focuses on the mythological spirit which inhabits this place. The works have titles such as Orseis, Abarbarea, and Nysa, named after the water, rock, and flower nymphs of Greek mythology. In color and in black-and-white, Esser approaches the water- and wildlife sprawling in the ruins and rubble, creating an allegorical set of works which breathes new life into these nymphs.
The high quality of Esser’s one-of-a-kind prints emphasizes the mysterious character of the surroundings in which the works were created. In a special process, the photographs were printed directly on aluminum and coated with Shellac, giving their surface a painterly quality. The photo works are supplemented by video installations which render the movements of the water and its sounds in the Garden more tangible.

Elger Esser (born 1967 in Stuttgart) spent his final school years in Rome. He returned to Germany to study in the famous class of Bernd and Hilla Becher at the Academy of Arts in Düsseldorf (1991–1997). Since then, his landscape images and vedute have been shown in numerous international venues, among them the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum New York, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, the Kunsthaus Zürich, the Centre Pompidou Paris, and the Lenbachhaus Munich.

 
 

Florian Süssmayr

Florian Süssmayr

14.11.2014 - 31.01.2015
Florian Süssmayr
Betti, 2014
Öl auf Leinwand, 170 x 140 cm

Hey, Lovers Club, Geyerwally, Lindwurmstrasse, Schelling Salon, U6 Großhadern, Marienplatz, Nein, BC Harta, Ok Girls – these are some of the titles that are typical for the works of Florian Süssmayr. His repertoire ranges from the haphazard – such as his recent series of t-shirts smudged with oil, which he wears when he paints and which manifest both as framed objects and re-portrayed as oil paintings – to hand-picked and staged subjects which often have their origin in everyday life.
One of the artist’s new works shows the back of a woman’s head with classically coiffed hair which anticipates an equally pretty face, the sight of which we are, however, denied. "Betti" is Süssmayr’s version of Gerhard Richter’s almost eponymous painting. Much like its precursor, it is a photorealistic painting which remains reduced to a color palette of shades of white, gray, brown, and black, as Süssmayr’s works frequently do. The artist applies the paint directly and in a single step to the correct spot on the canvas. Florian Süssmayr is a master of this “pinnacle” of the classic disciplines of art.
However, this painting also consists of a second act. Süssmayr’s "Betti" does not wear a quaint flower blazer, but a riveted leather jacket – perhaps a reminiscence of Florian Süssmayr’s punk phase, when he toured with his band Lorenz Lorenz, and a nod to the left-wing autonomous milieu of the 1980s, which he was part of? It is more likely that the artist consciously seeks out a counterpoint to the bourgeois idyll of Gerhard Richter’s portrait. “Fuck the …” is written in large letters on the leather jacket. Here Süssmayr quotes yet another painter, Daniel Richter, a punk among painters. Punk motifs and quotes are present in the works of both artists, and there are also biographical parallels. We read the once controversial and by now politically rather irrelevant slogan, “Fuck the Police,” on a riveted jacket in Daniel Richter’s painting, "Lonely Old Slogan". The two artists share a rather subversive mindset. It is a joy to see how Florian Süssmayr manages to combine Gerhard Richter’s bourgeois motif with the subject of the rebel Daniel Richter, while remaining genuinely Süssmayr in the process.
Often, Süssmayr’s motifs are not exactly unambiguous. The character of his images changes through layering: Subtitles render his paintings film stills, overpainting makes a landscape scribbling paper, scratches and signs of wear and tear transform a mannerist resurrection scene into a blatant reproduction. Correspondingly, the artist transposes his motifs into various media: A photograph becomes a painting which, in turn, is photographed, photocopied, or printed as a wallpaper to become the background of new images.
A limited edition will be published exclusively for the exhibition.

 

 
 

Goshka Macuga

Goshka Macuga

Madness and Ritual

12.09.2014 - 08.11.2014
Goshka Macuga
Aby Warburg on Madness and Ritual, set for Scene 2, 2014
tapestry, 270 x 366 cm
© Goshka Macuga, courtesy Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle
Foto: Simon Vogel
Startseite: detail

“Madness and Ritual” is the title of Goshka Macuga's fourth exhibition at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle. This exhibition seeks to put the mental state of the art world to the test and subjects the gray area between madness and mental health to close examination.
On the occasion of the 8th Berlin Biennale, Goshka Macuga has taken on a new genre by staging a play for theater. Another play sparked Macuga's project: "Hamburg Conversations on Art and Culture," penned by the renowned art historian Aby Warburg (1866–1929) for a family reunion, is a comedy exploring a dispute between the conservative and the radical wing of the art scene at the time.
Warburg’s material prompted Goshka Macuga to write an amusing analysis of today's art world. Her play, performed in Berlin – consisting in equal parts of choreography, lecture, and performance – is the inspirational basis for the exhibition at Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle. Many of the works on view are closely connected to the performed play; the exhibition emphasizes the medium of collage, which takes on two- and three-dimensional forms and culminates in a multicolored tapestry. The exhibition shows sculptures of the protagonists and a new video work which emerged from recordings of the play. Goshka Macuga's works cannot be pinned down to a single medium, but rather a method which is connected to thorough research and which, therefore, frequently corresponds to historical and curatorial approaches. Goshka Macuga already dealt with Aby Warburg before, in her exhibition "I Am Become Death" (2008), specifically with his “Mnemosyne Atlas” and his writings. Macuga detects parallels to her own work in his way of working, his very unconventional approach, and his examination of the function of the predetermined contents of images.
Goshka Macuga, born in 1967 in Warsaw, lives and works in London. She is one of the preeminent figures of the artist generation who has generated strong signals in contemporary art by working retrospectively and by analyzing current events. Her tapestries, sculptures, installations, photography, collages, and films often question not only the presentation and production of art, but also curatorial practice, which she has adopted for her own work.
Macuga has been the subject of many international solo exhibitions: at the Tate Britain in 2007, the Whitechapel Gallery in London in 2008, the Kunsthalle Basel in 2009, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis in 2012, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago in 2014, and the Kunsthalle Lund in 2014. In 2006, she participated in the São Paulo Biennial, followed by the Liverpool Biennial in 2006, the Berlin Biennale in 2008, the Venice Biennale, and the Berlin Biennale again in 2014. Her spectacular contribution to the Documenta 13 – a diptych consisting of monumental photorealistic tapestries – will long be remembered.
 

Candida Höfer

Candida Höfer

Düsseldorf

06.06.2014 - 31.07.2014
Candida Höfer
Deutsche Oper am Rhein Düsseldorf I 2012
chromogenic print
180 x 252,5 cm
© Candida Höfer; VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014

Candida Höfer, geboren 1944 in Eberswalde, zählt unumstritten zu den führenden internationalen Fotokünstlerinnen der Gegenwart. Bekannt ist sie vor allem für ihre großformatigen Farbfotografien von zumeist menschenleeren Innenräumen, die eine künstlerische und kulturelle Bedeutung haben. Orte des Wissens, der Bildung und des Kunstgenusses wie Bibliotheken und Museen, repräsentative Säle irdischer und himmlischer Macht in Palästen und Kirchen, kulturelle Begegnungsstätten wie Theater und Opernhäuser, die sie betont sachlich, aus der Zentralperspektive oder einer idealen Diagonale heraus komponiert.
Was auf den ersten Blick in seiner Perfektion zunächst unspektakulär erscheint, enthüllt bei genauerer Betrachtung ein die Architektur durchdringendes Ordnungssystem, das bis in die Tiefe des Bildes präzise wiedergegeben wird. In vielen Arbeiten durchbrechen zufällige Details wie eine verschobene Absperrung, ein stehen gebliebener Eimer oder ein unschöner fleckiger Boden die strikte Ordnung. Spuren von momentan nicht mehr anwesenden Menschen geben der auf den ersten Blick idealisiert erscheinenden Szenerie Alltäglichkeit und Normalität.
Candida Höfer stellt seit 1985 in der Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle aus. Unsere diesjährige Ausstellung trägt den Titel „Düsseldorf“. Für die Künstlerin ist Düsseldorf verbunden mit ihren Anfängen. Allem voran ihr Studium an der Akademie in der bekannten Klasse von Bernd und Hilla Becher (1976 – 1982). Dem Thema widmete sich die große Einzelausstellung „Candida Höfer: Düsseldorf“ im dortigen Museum Kunstpalast (Sep 2013 – Feb 2014). Daraus zeigen wir in München eine Auswahl.
Im Erdgeschoss verweist die „Projektion Düsseldorf III 2012“ auf Candida Höfers frühe Erfahrungen mit dem Medium Film. Durchlaufend führt die Installation elf in der Mitte der 1970er Jahre entstandene Selbstportraits mit Kamera vor. Dabei wird die Künstlerin im Bild nur andeutungsweise als transparente Spiegelung in Schaufenstern von Läden des alltäglichen Bedarfs sichtbar. Begleitet wird die Wandinstallation von einer aktuellen fünfteiligen Bildergruppe kleineren Formats, „Düsseldorf IV 2012“. Größtenteils ohne Titel und somit ohne den gewohnten Hinweis auf den Entstehungsort, rücken die Arbeiten Farbflächen, Überblendungen und Lichtrefelexe in den Fokus - womöglich eine neue Tendenz der Künstlerin zu mehr abstrakt anmutenden Arbeiten. Gleiches gilt für zwei im ersten Stock gezeigte Großformate: „Neuer Stahlhof Düsseldorf I und II 2012“. Schneckenförmige dunkle Linien durchziehen die fast gänzlich in weiß gehaltenen Bildkompositionen. Erst auf den zweiten Blick erschließt sich, bedingt durch die ungewohnte Perspektive, dass dies einTreppenhaus einmal in Auf-, einmal in Untersicht ist. Weitere Großfotografien, darunter „Deutsche Oper am Rhein Düsseldorf I 2012“ und Arbeiten aus dem Benrather Schloss, vervollständigen die Ausstellung.
 

Maria Bartuszova

Maria Bartuszova

04.04.2014 - 31.05.2014
Abbildung:
Maria Bartuszova
Untitled 20, 1985
plaster
213x118x25 cm

Im Erdgeschoss der Galerie zeigen wir parallel zu Thomas Ruff im ersten Stock ausgewählte Werke aus dem Nachlass von Maria Bartuszova (1936-1997). Der non-figurative sinnliche Formenschatz der in Prag geborenen Künstlerin umspannt die Materialien Gips, Holz, Stein, Bronze und Aluminium. Maria Bartuszovas Kunstwerke waren nach mehreren Ausstellungen in Osteuropa auf der documenta 12 (2007) erstmalig einem internationalen Publikum vorgestellt worden.
Seit 2008 stellt die Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle ihre teils sehr fragilen Werke regelmäßig aus. 2010 folgten die Gruppenausstellungen im Centre Pompidou (Les promesses du passé) und 2013 “Fritz Winter, das innere der Natur” im Kunstmuseum Stuttgart. Ein umfassender Werkkatalog der Künstlerin, erarbeitet von der Kunsthistorikerin Gabriela Garlatyova und der Familie von Maria Bartuszova, insbesondere von den Töchtern Anna und Veronika, mit Texten von Noemi Smolik, Jan Verwoert u.a. wird voraussichtlich in diesem Jahr erscheinen.
 

Thomas Ruff

04.04.2014 - 31.05.2014
Abbildung (Startseite):
Thomas Ruff
phg.05_II, 2012
chromogenic print
240 x 185 cm

Thomas Ruffs seit 2012 entstehende Serie „phg“ (photograms) entsteht in Fortsetzung seiner sich konsequent von der klassischen Fotografie weiter entwickelnden Technik auf vollständig digitale Weise. Inspiration lieferte die in den 1920er Jahren durch die Surrealisten bekannt gewordene Fotogrammtechnik, bei der ohne Verwendung einer Kamera in Handarbeit durch direkte Belichtung von Objekten Schwarz-Weiß-Motive entstehen.
Eine nach Künstlerwunsch entwickelte 3D Software versetzt Thomas Ruff nun in die Lage, Fotogramme quasi als digitales Faksimile auch für große Formate zu verwirklichen und dabei Farben einzusetzen. Dies geschieht auf verschiedene Weise, so steht das Kürzel “s.” im Titel einer Arbeit beispielsweise für “solarisiert” (überbelichtet), “ch.” für “chromatisch”, d.h. das farbige Licht sitzt auf dem Objekt selbst. Was entsteht sind vielfältige frei schwingende Formen, Kreise, Wellen, Linien und Flächen von gedeckter Farbigkeit in Kompositionen, die an die Malerei der 1920er Jahre erinnern, aber über ihre eigene, in das 21. Jahrhundert weisende Ästhetik verfügen. Wir freuen uns sehr, dass Thomas Ruff, der schon seit den 1980er Jahren in der Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle regelmäßig ausstellt, eine Auswahl seiner neuen Serie im oberen Raum vorstellt.
 

Lorena Herrera Rashid

Lorena Herrera Rashid

07.02.2014 - 29.03.2014
Abbildungen:
Lorrena Herrera Rashid
No One, 2014

Die in Mexiko geborene Künstlerin Lorena Herrera Rashid zeigt ihre zweite Ausstellung in der Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle unter dem Titel New Solutions. Es dreht sich um Themen wie Medien, Konsum, Künstlichkeit, Verschwendung und Reflektion.
Das Werk No One besteht aus einer Rose in einer umgedrehten, gläsernen Vase und zwei bearbeiteten Händen. Die Rose befindet sich seit etwa einem Jahr in der Glaskugel. Sie hat zwar ihre ursprüngliche Form bewahrt, aber ihre rote Farbe verloren und symbolisiert so das Memento Mori. Die Glaskugel in Kombination mit den Händen erinnert stark an die Darstellung von Wahrsagern. Durch dieses Zusammenspiel wird Zeitlichkeit in den Fokus gesetzt und Vergangenheit, Gegenwart und Zukunft in einem Moment erlebt.
Die Figuren mit dem Titel New Solutions I – IV können als kleinste gesellschaftliche Einheit, die Familie oder auch als Individuum innerhalb einer Gesellschaft gesehen werden. Nr. I bis III sind unterschiedlich große Plastiken, die als Gruppe vor einem Spiegel positioniert sind. Die Werke sind auf verschiedene Art und Weise aus Materialien wie Holz, Sperrholzplatten, Aluminium und Teilen von Möbeln zusammengesetzt. Durch die Hände der Schaufensterpuppen erhalten die Figuren einen menschlichen Charakter. Die Spiegelung der Gruppe führt zum einen zu einer Doppelung der Szenerie, aus einem bestimmten Blickwinkel aber auch zur Einbeziehung des Betrachters in diese Gruppe.
Die dritte Arbeit der Ausstellung trägt den Titel Savings. Sie ist eine Zusammenstellung gleichmäßiger, industrieller Massenprodukte. Erst auf den zweiten Blick erkennt man, dass die eingesetzten Objekte Unterschiede aufweisen. Die Steigerung der Unterschiede besteht darin, dass jede Dose, jeder Karton und auch die Palette ihre eigene, individuelle Nummer trägt. Auch bei dieser Arbeit wurden Spiegel eingesetzt, um den Multiplikations- und Reflektionsgedanken unseres Konsumverhaltens anzuregen.
Lorena Herrera Rashid schafft es auf ironische und zurückhaltende Art und Weise dem Betrachter den Spiegel vor Augen zu halten. Die Welt, in der wir leben ist von Massenmedien, Künstlichkeit, Konsum und Verschwendung geprägt, sodass wir manchmal nicht mehr zwischen der realen und der künstlichen Welt unterscheiden können. Dieses Phänomen macht Rashid in jeder einzelnen Arbeit, aber auch im Gesamtwerk der Ausstellung spürbar. Geschickt bezieht die Künstlerin dabei den Betrachter mit ein, setzt ihn mit den Plastiken in Korrespondenz und konfrontiert ihn so mit kritischen Denkanstössen, die nach neuen Lösungsansätzen fragen - New Solutions, doch das Ende bleibt offen.
 

Heinz Frank

Heinz Frank

07.02.2014 - 29.03.2014
Abbildungen:
Keine Augen, die das Nichts sehen, 1975
Ausstellungsansicht „Der Ungeduld der Freiheit Gestalt zu geben“, Württembergischer Kunstverein 2013
Foto: Hans D. Christ, Courtesy: Heinz Frank

Zum ersten Mal zeigt die Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle Arbeiten des österreichischen Künstlers Heinz Frank.
Der Titel der Ausstellung ist zugleich ein Zitat des Künstlers: "Ewige Treue hält das Loch seiner Leere. Jede Äußerung ist ein inneres oder innerstes Selbstporträt". Aussagen wie diese führen den Betrachter gleich zum Kern seiner Arbeit. Am Anfang steht ein Gedanke, der wird notiert und anschließend in eine Form gebracht. 'Dem gedachten Gefühl gibt er Material, um es zu fixieren'.
Zur Formgebung bedient sich Heinz Frank zufällig gefundener Objekte aus Holz oder Metall, Teilen von Möbeln und mit Vorliebe Steinen. Aus diesen Einzelteilen entstehen geheimnisvolle und rätselhafte Gebilde, die immer wieder das Bild vom Loch, Auge, Hirn oder anderen Körperteilen hervorbringen. Es geht darum, wie alles miteinander verbunden ist und was davon bleibt.
Im Umgang mit dem Material lotet Frank Spannungsfelder wie hart/weich, kalt/heiss, innen/aussen und Anfang/Ende aus und zeigt das, was dazwischen liegt. In Verbindung mit seinen treffend, lakonischen Aussagen sprechen die Objekte für sich und verbleiben als Spuren eines einstigen Gedankens.
Die Assemblagen von Heinz Frank sind stark von dem schweizer Bildhauer Alberto Giacometti beeinflusst, der sich schon vor hundert Jahren traute den Körper nur auf das Nötigste zu reduzieren, um ihn zur Figur werden zu lassen und so das Essenzielle sichtbar zu machen.
Heinz Frank (*1939 in Wien) studierte Architektur und Design an der Akademie der bildenden Künste in Wien. Seit den 1970er Jahren widmet er sich der künstlerischen Arbeit. Seine Werke wurden seither in zahlreichen Ausstellungen gezeigt und sind in österreichischen Sammlungen, wie dem Museum moderner Kunst - Stiftung Ludwig Wien (Mumok), dem Museum für angewandte Kunst (MAK) in Wien oder dem Rupertinum in Salzburg, vertreten.
 

Andreas Gursky / Jeff Wall

Andreas Gursky / Jeff Wall

29.10.2013 - 25.01.2014
Abbildungen:
links:
Andreas Gursky, Ohne Titel XV, 2008
© Andreas Gursky
Startseite:
Jeff Wall, Band and Crowd, 2011

Gleich zwei große Ausnahmekünstler auf dem Gebiet der zeitgenössischen Fotografie stehen sich erstmalig explizit in einer gemeinsamen Ausstellung gegenüber, obschon die Idee für dieses Projekt, basierend auf wechselseitiger Wertschätzung, schon seit vielen Jahren besteht.
Andreas Gursky, geboren 1955, besuchte erst die Folkwang-Schule in Essen, deren Fachbereich Fotografie ein hohes Renommee genoss, bevor er sich auf Rat seines Freundes Thomas Struth zu Beginn der 1980er Jahre an der Kunstakademie Düsseldorf in die bekannte Fotoschule unter Bernd und Hilla Becher bewarb. Andreas Gurskys frühe Werke sind zumeist kleinformatig und eher dokumentarischer oder konzeptueller Natur. Die Motive umspannen hauptsächlich die Bereiche Landschaft, Architektur und Interieur. 1986 hatte er seine erste Ausstellung bei Rüdiger Schöttle in München. Ende der 1980er Jahre beginnt er großformatig zu arbeiten und sich die Möglichkeiten der computergestützten Bildbearbeitung zunutze zu machen. Durch auf den ersten Blick kaum als solche ersichtliche Montage entstehen einige seiner bekanntesten Werke, die sich durch additive ornamentale Strukturen bei zugleich homogen wirkenden Oberflächen auszeichnen. Erst bei genauerer Betrachtung erschließen sich mehr und mehr Details, was zu der großen Faszination von Andreas Gurskys Arbeiten beiträgt, der heute zu den erfolgreichsten zeitgenössischen Fotografen zählt. Er lebt und arbeitet in Düsseldorf.
Jeff Wall, geboren 1946 in Vancouver, wo er bis heute ansässig ist, beeinflusste die zeitgenössische Fotografie seit den frühen 1980er Jahren auf wohl einzigartige Art und Weise. Seit 1981 ist er bereits mit der Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle verbunden. Seinen frühen Bezug zu München bespiegelt auch die von November 2013 bis März 2014 andauernde Werkschau in der Pinakothek der Moderne. Dabei genießen Jeff Walls unverwechselbare, großformatige Diapositive in Leuchtkästen offenbar die größte Bekanntheit, aber auch Schwarz-Weiß-Fotografien und C- bzw. Inkjetprints ergänzen seine Technik. In einem aufwendigen Entstehungsprozess inszeniert der studierte Kunsthistoriker seine Fotografien ähnlich einem Filmset, so dass auf ihnen entgegen dem ersten Eindruck kein Detail zufällig ist. Einflüsse zeigen sich aus ganz verschiendenen Bereichen wie Malerei und Skulptur vergangener Epochen, verbunden mit alltäglichen Medien der heutigen Zeit, insbesondere Film und Werbung. Die scheinbar realen Sujets wirken oft wie dem Alltagsleben entsprungenen oder führen mitunter drastische, aktionsreiche Szenen aus einem raueren Milieu vor. In unserer diesjährigen Ausstellung liegt der Schwerpunkt von Jeff Walls Arbeiten auf C-Prints, die im weitesten Sinne dem Thema Musik und Jugend zuzuordnen sind. Herzstück ist die großformatige Arbeit Band & Crowd von 2011.
Andreas Gursky zeigt neben weiteren Arbeiten ebenfalls ein sehr großes Querformat – Ohne Titel XV, dessen Hintergrund die silbermetallisch glänzende Schwammstruktur einer Akustikwand beherrscht. Ein weiteres Hightlight wird die neue Arbeit Lehmbruck von 2013 sein.
 

Steven Claydon

Steven Claydon

14.09.2013 - 19.10.2013
Abbildung:
Steven Claydon
The passage of different substance (detail)
Installation view, firstsite, Colchester, 2012
Ceramic, wicker, Formica, acrylic, powder coated steel, copper, polyurethane foam, hessian, string, peacock feathers, gum rubber, wood, brass
178 x 200 x 400 cm
photo: Andy Keate

Compulsive Communicators
Mit spielerischer Präzision hinterfragt Steven Claydon (*1969) allgemein geltende Denkstrukturen und Taxonomien. Er arbeitet mit unterschiedlichen Materialien und Ästhetiken, stellt Artefakte Alltagsgegenständen gegenüber, setzt Repliken neben Originale. Durch ihre besondere Präsentationsform knüpft der Künstler an die Ausstellungstradition naturgeschichtlicher und prähistorischer Museen an. Gleichsam setzt sich Claydon mit dem Konstruktionscharakter von Sammlungen und Archiven auseinander sowie mit der kuratorischen Praxis an sich.
 

Martin Creed

Martin Creed

14.09.2013 - 19.10.2013
Abbildung:
Martin Creed
Work No: 671
Friends, 2007
Yellow neon
6 in / 15.2 cm high
Edition of 3 + 1 AP
photo: Hugo Glendinning

„Everything is going to be alright; don't worry; Things“ oder einfach nur „Friends“ lauten die weittragenden Schriftzüge der Neonröhren Martin Creeds (*1968).
Seine minimalistisch geprägten Arbeiten gehen gedanklich weit über das eigentliche Objekt hinaus und lösen unweigerlich Assoziationen und Reflexionen aus. Seit 1987 nummeriert Creed seine Werke, die Werktitel bezeichnen dabei das Werk unmittelbar: „Work No. 656. A sheet of paper folded and unfolded“ ist ein gefaltetes und entfaltetes Blatt Papier.
 

Andrew Palmer

Andrew Palmer

Disjunction of Men

17.05.2013 - 03.08.2013
Andrew Palmer
Untitled, 2012

Die Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle freut sich, mit Disjunction of Men die zweite Einzelausstellung des jungen britischen Künstlers Andrew Palmer zu präsentieren.
Die Ausstellung zeigt einen neuen Werkzyklus an Gemälden in zwei- und dreidimensionaler Form. Ergänzt werden diese durch von Hand geflochtene Holzzäune, die den Ausstellungsraum teilen und dessen geradlinige Architektur akzentuieren. Ähnlich den Arbeiten erweitert der Ausstellungstitel Disjunction of Men die offene, dennoch gelenkte Welt möglicher Interpretationen.
Palmers Werk konfrontiert uns mit einer Welt jenseits des Sicht- und Definierbaren. Intuition und Zeit spielen eine wichtige Rolle in einem Prozess, bei dem Materialien geschichtet, verdichtet, entfernt und auflöst werden. Über mehrere Monate hinweg modelliert er mit Spachtel, Pinsel und Skalpell verschiedenste Materialien wie Ölfarbe, Acrylgips und Lack auf Leinwände, Massivholzplatten und gefundenes Gestein. Er schichtet und exkaviert und erschafft flache Reliefs, die darunter liegende komplexe Strukturen in Pastell- und Erdtönen gleichzeitig verbergen und offenbaren. Wie der Titel bereits suggeriert, liegt Palmers Hauptaugenmerk auf der Wahrnehmung von Grenzen, Überschneidungen, Trennung und Vereinigung, was er mit einer ausgefeilten Technik demonstriert. So setzt er Bildraum und Sinneswahrnehmung in Widerspruch: er lässt Vorder- und Hintergründe kippen und negative und positive Form verschmelzen. Gleichzeitig lösen sich die Unterschiede zwischen tatsächlichem und illusionärem Raum auf. Die daraus resultierenden Arbeiten wecken Assoziationen an organische Strukturen, digitale Systeme, alte Gemäuer oder vergangene und zukünftige Welten.
Disjunction of Men ist eine komplexe Komposition von Fläche und Raum, die durch das Zusammenspiel von Objekten und Materialien, von Farbe, Form und Textur entsteht. In einem steten Wechsel von Fülle und Leere, von Licht und Schatten, kreiert Andrew Palmer einen Raum mäandernder Dimensionen. Ungreifbar und in einem konstanten Zustand des Wandels, entzieht sich die Ausstellung jeglicher Kontinuität und greift somit auch das Rätsel um die eigene Subjektivität auf.
 

Thomas Helbig

Thomas Helbig

S

17.05.2013 - 03.08.2013
Thomas Helbig
Untitled 2013

Thomas Helbig ist bekannt für seine Skulpturen, die in ihrer Allansichtigkeit zum Umschreiten einladen und deren Detailreichtum den Betrachter immer wieder zu neuen Assoziationen anleiten. Sie stehen im Dialog mit seinen Gemälden, die in ihrer Reduktion auf scheinbar abstrakte und gleichzeitig erzählerische Strukturen faszinieren.
Helbigs neue Arbeiten sind gekennzeichnet durch einen gewissen Existentialismus der Mittel als eine Praxis der Reduzierung. Die Malerei besteht aus Farbspuren, die scheinbar direkt aus der Tube auf die Leinwand gedrückt sind. Ein „S“ zeichnet sich ab, ein Buchstabe, eine Figur, eine Spur oder auch fast nichts; aber eben nur fast, noch ist das Sujet nicht wirklich aufgehoben. Der monochrome unbemalte Hintergrund, ein farbiges Textil, hat sich verselbstständigt und wirft Falten, als wolle sich die Malfläche zur Skulptur erheben. Lucio Fontanas Errungenschaften des „Spazialismo“, die die Fläche zum Raum werden läßt, werden unmittelbar in Erinnerung gerufen und formieren sich als Negativgeste in Helbigs Arbeiten.
Lucio Fontanas Philosophie des Nichts, das er nicht als das Nichts der Zerstörung, sondern als das Nichts der Schöpfung versteht, findet sich auch in der neuen Skulptur Helbigs wieder. In einem Schrank, einem Aufbewahrungsutensil einer vergangener Zeit, wird wie in einem Schrein ein Objekt aufgebahrt; ein Fragment eines Glastisches, ein „übrig gebliebener Rest einer kaputten Kulissenwelt“, wie so oft in Thomas Helbigs Werk. Beide Objekte sind zerstört und ihrer ursprünglichen Funktion beraubt, zusammen bilden sie etwas Neues und entfalten ihre eigene inspirierende Kraft. Zerstörung, ein wesentlicher Bestandteil der Skulpturen Helbigs, ist als Befreiung, als Öffnung jenseits des Objektes zu verstehen.
Thomas Helbig (*1967) lebt und arbeitet in Berlin. Er studierte an der Akademie der Künste, München und am Goldsmith College in London. Zahlreiche Ausstellungen wurden ihm international gewidmet, seine Werke sind in namhaften Privatsammlungen und öffentlichen Sammlungen vertreten.
 

Janis Avotins

Janis Avotins

23.03.2013 - 11.05.2013
Jānis Avotinš
Untitled a, 2013

Jānis Avotinš hat seine eigene, unverwechselbare Sprache in der Malerei gefunden. Bekannt sind seine atmosphärischen Landschaften und „Seelenlandschaften“ zwischenmenschlicher Beziehungen, die mit reduzierter Farbpalette auf die Leinwände gehaucht sind. Im Vordergrund seines malerischen Interesses stehen die Emotionen, die Beziehung zwischen Innen und Außen, Rückblicke auf Vergangenes, Alltag und Ideologien.

In den neuen Arbeiten scheint sein Augenmerk vor allem auf Licht und Raum gerichtet zu sein. Die Gegensätze von Hell und Dunkel bestimmen zunehmend Komposition und Bildwirkung seiner Gemälde. Dieser, von Caravaggio als bewusste Bildgestaltung eingeführte, Chiaroscuro-Effekt verleiht Avotinš Gemälden eine unverwechselbare Aura. Die Personen werden aus dem dunklen, diffusen Hintergrund mit heller werdenden Tonabstufungen moduliert und wirken wie Lichtgestalten. Die starken Kontraste ergeben eine plastische Körperlichkeit und Stoffmodellierung, die eine effektvolle Dramatisierung des Bildinhaltes evoziert. Die vollständige Person lässt sich oft nur erahnen.

Jānis Avotinš wurde 1981 in Lettland geboren,studierte an der Janis Rozentals Kunstschule und der Lettischen Kunstakademie in Riga. Seine Arbeiten sind in zahlreichen namhaften Privatsammlungen vertreten, sie wurden in der Bundeskunsthalle Bonn (2013), der Saatchi Gallery London (2012), im Contemporary Art Center Vilnius (2010), der Stadtgalerie Schwaz und dem Ludwig Forum für Internationale Kunst in Aachen (2008) gezeigt.
 

Stephan Balkenhol

Stephan Balkenhol

23.03.2013 - 11.05.2013
Die Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle freut sich, neue bildhauerische Arbeiten des Künstlers Stephan Balkenhol zu präsentieren.

Weltbekannt und unverwechselbar sind Stephan Balkenhols grob geschnitzte und farbig gefasste Holzfiguren. Im Zentrum seiner Motivwelt stehen der Mensch, Tiere und phantasievolle Hybridwesen. Immer wieder variiert der Künstler die Körper von Männern und Frauen, zeigt sie häufig in neutraler Kleidung und ruhiger Gestik, manchmal aber auch ausgefallen inszeniert und mit unerwarteten Attributen ausgestattet. Obwohl keine Figur der anderen gleicht, erscheinen ihre Gesichter in ihrem Ausdruck rätselhaft typisiert, über dem Individuellen stehend, bewegt und still zugleich. Sie verweisen auf keine bestimmten Persönlichkeiten, illustrieren nicht und erzählen keine Geschichten. Ihre Deutung soll offen bleiben. Sie wirken zeitlos modern und zeigen sich unbeeindruckt vom hektischen Drang zum ständig Neuen und Spektakulären um sie herum. Kaum ein anderer zeitgenössischer Bildhauer findet ein modellhafteres Abbild des modernen Menschen.

Dieser Ausdruck steht in einem gewissen Widerspruch zu der von Splittern, Kerben und Fugen übersäten Oberfläche, die von einem expressionistischen Schaffensprozess zeugt: die Figuren werden mit Motorsäge und traditionellen Holzwerkzeugen grob aus dem Holz gesägt, gehauen und geschnitzt. Gerade diese scheinbare Diskrepanz verleiht den Skulpturen und Reliefs ihre Faszination und macht sie so unverwechselbar.

Neben kleinformatigen Holzskulpturen und Wandreliefs für den Innenraum nehmen die Arbeiten für den öffentlichen Raum im Schaffen Stephan Balkenhols eine hohe Stellung ein. So wird im Mai 2013 in Leipzig das neue Richard Wagner Denkmal, gestaltet von Stephan Balkenhol, eingeweiht. 2012 bespielte Stephan Balkenhol mit seinen Werken die Kasseler Kirche Sankt Elisabeth.

Stephan Balkenhol (*1957) lebt und arbeitet in Meisenthal, Frankreich, und in Karlsruhe, wo er seit 1992 eine Professur für Bildhauerei an der Staatlichen Akademie der Bildenden Künste inne hat. Seit 1988 stellt er regelmäßig in der Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle aus.
 

Anri Sala I Edi Rama

Anri Sala I Edi Rama

Creating Space Where There Appears To Be None

18.01.2013 - 16.03.2013
Die Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle freut sich, das Jahr 2013 mit einem Ausstellungsprojekt des Künstlers Anri Sala zu beginnen.
Seit 2000 stellt die Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle Anri Sala regelmäßig aus. Bisher waren ausschließlich Filminstallationen präsentiert, die aktuelle Ausstellung konzentriert sich nun auf das Projekt ‚Creating Space Where There Appears to Be None’, das in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Künstler Edi Rama entstand und zu dem Gesprächsaufnahmen und eine Reihe von Zeichnungen von Edi Rama und Anri Sala gehören. Edi Rama, mit Anri Sala befreundeter Künstler und Politiker, beteiligte sich nach Zusammenbruch des kommunistischen Regimes aktiv an den ersten Demokratiebewegungen Albaniens. Nach einem Aufenthalt in Paris, bei dem er sich ganz seiner künstlerischen Karriere widmete, kehrte er in den 1990er Jahren nach Albanien zurück und war unter anderem von 1998 bis 2000 Minister für Kultur, Jugend und Sport, danach Bürgermeister von Tirana von 2000 bis 2011. Seit 2005 ist er Vorsitzender der Sozialistischen Partei (SP).

"Creating space where there appears to be none between the foreground and the background of a drawing, an in-between dimension: through the rabbit hole we freefall to unfold the compressed space underlying a doodle over the papers of a politician. Duty-freed from the dire reality of their pages, Edi Rama's doodles take on a repetitive form like that of a "reality planner" whose bird's eye vision of a landscape demarcates neighbourhoods as zones of thought through the cartography of colour. The lines curve and curl, never remaining straight for too-great a distance, loosely binding the day-to-day. Over the past 10 years, these automated abstractions have connected the present to the otherwise unintelligible future."
Anri Sala, 2010

‚Creating Space Where There Appears to Be None’ beruht auf einem gleichnamigen Projekt aus dem Jahr 2010, bei dem Anri Sala von der Berliner About Change, Collection eingeladen war, in einer Art Ateliersituation ein Kunstprojekt zu erarbeiten. Sala hatte damals den befreundeten Künstler Edi Rama eingeladen und das Studio nicht nur als Ausstellungsort, sondern auch als Ort zur Aufnahme von Gesprächen mit weiteren Gästen genutzt: es wurden Dialoge zwischen Edi Rama und dem Kunsthistoriker Michael Fried, dem Künstler Philippe Parreno, dem Philosoph Marcus Steinweg und dem Aktivisten Erion Veliaj aufgenommen.

Die aktuelle Ausstellung in der Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle ist als Dokumentation und Fortsetzung gleichermaßen zu sehen. Die Dialoge der damals mitwirkenden Personen werden im Erdgeschoss der Galerie an Hörstationen präsentiert. Zur Ausstellungseröffnung wird ein weiteres Gespräch aufgezeichnet und setzt die Konversationsreihe fort: Edi Rama und Anri Sala sprechen mit Okwui Enwezor, Direktor des Haus der Kunst, München.
Im ersten Stock der Galerie ist die Serie der ‚Inversions’, Resultat der Zusammenarbeit zwischen Edi Rama und Anri Sala, ausgestellt. Die sogenannten ‚doodles’ (zu Deutsch ‚Kritzeleien’) zeichnet Edi Rama während seiner beruflichen Tätigkeit als Politiker, also während Sitzungen oder Telefonaten - dabei bleibt vorerst offen, ob die Zeichnungen Produkte größter Aufmerksamkeit oder Resultate tagträumerischer Abwesenheit sind. Wie Lavaströme ergießen sich Linien, Formen und Farben auf dem Papier und können so als Sinnbild unserer assoziativen Gedankenflüsse gelesen werden. Anri Sala antwortet auf die Zeichnungen seines Freundes und entwickelt seinen eigenen Blick darauf: er extrahiert die Farben, Formen und Linien und kreiert neue Kompositionen. In einem weiteren Schritt konfrontiert er diese neuen zeichnerischen Gebilde mit jenen Edi Ramas: gespiegelt legt er sie auf die Rückseite der Zeichnungen. Die gerahmten Zeichnungen sind – um Vorder- und Rückseite betrachten zu können – senkrecht zur Wand gehängt.

Anlässlich der Ausstellung wird eine Publikation veröffentlicht, in der sich Anri Sala mit verborgenen Beziehungen und unterschiedlichen Realitätsschichten auseinander setzt. Den Zeichnungen Edi Ramas und seiner ‚Inversions’ stellt er internationale, nationale und lokale Nachrichtenmeldungen sowie Zitate aus Aleksandr Rodchenko's Tagebuch ‚Experiments For The Future’ (1911-1956) gegenüber und eröffnet damit neue Verbindungen.
Die Publikation wird zudem die vier Gespräche mit Michael Fried, Philippe Parreno, Marcus Steinweg und Erion Veliaj beinhalten.

Anri Sala wurde 1974 in Tirana geboren und lebt und arbeitet in Berlin. Er hatte u.a. Einzelausstellungen im Museum for Contemporary Art Miami, in der Serpentine Gallery London, im Centre Pompidou Paris und im Louisiana Museum for Contemporary Art Humlebæk/Dänemark. 2012 war er Teilnehmer der dOCUMENTA (13) in Kassel, 2013 wird er Frankreich bei der Biennale in Venedig repräsentieren. In München ist bis 10.2.2013 seine Arbeit ‚Long Sorrow’ in der Ausstellung ‚ECM - eine kulturelle Archäologie’ im Haus der
Kunst München zu sehen.
 

Florian Süssmayr

Florian Süssmayr

Landschaften und Portraits

09.11.2012 - 12.01.2013
Florian Süssmayr
Ruth Ann Moorehouse
2012, 30 x 25 cm

Die Galerie Schöttle freut sich, eine weitere Ausstellung des Münchner Künstlers Florian Süssmayr zu präsentieren. Florian Süssmayr zeigt neue Bilder aus den Themenkomplexen Landschaft und Portrait, die er mit Schriftbildern kombiniert.

Welche Spuren hinterlassen Gewalt, Krieg und Exzess? Wie prägt die Geschichte Landschaften und Personen? Sieht man Mensch und Natur erlittene und verübte Gewalt an?
Florian Süssmayr beschreibt Folgen von Handlungen, die in der Vergangenheit liegen und dabei Orte und Personen prägten. Konkret zu sehen ist davon meistens nichts. Seine frühen „Farbund Fußballfelder“ beschreiben ein Fußballspiel, zeigen aber einen menschenleeren Platz. Seine Interieurs mit einsamen Tischen und Stühlen sind Orte, an denen etwas stattgefunden hat, das noch spürbar, aber nicht mehr sichtbar ist.
Einige Landschaften aus seiner neuen Serie sind als „Unbekannter Ort, Polen“ betitelt, stellvertretend für unbekannte Opfer an unbekannten Orten. Auf einem Bild liegen tote Hunde, einmal sieht man einen Schützengraben, aber auf den meisten Bildern assoziiert man diese Zeichen der Zerstörung automatisch.
Florian Süssmayr malt seit jeher nach fotografischen Vorlagen, die er in Magazinen und Büchern findet, die er aber auch selbst bei Spaziergängen mit der Handykamera festhält. So wird auch das Licht- und Schattenspiel der Baumwipfel auf den Bildern festgehalten: Ein kurzer Moment des Aufblitzens der Sonne durch die Blätter lässt uns ins Licht blinzeln. Ebenso wird ein beiläufiger Blick aus dem fahrenden Auto auf eine triste Stadtlandschaft festgehalten.
Alltägliches wird ästhetisiert: „Die Themen sind einfach, vielleicht unfreundlich; sie zeigen eine bestimmte Haltung. Skepsis, Distanz. Es ist eher etwas Düsteres, Aggressives, das sich breit macht. Und es geht um Alltäglichkeiten. Die meisten Motive sind unspektakulär. (…) Im Grunde ist es so, dass ich meine Motive einfach finde, das heißt ich finde einen Ausschnitt aus meiner Welt. Es geht um das Sehen und Erkennen.“ (Florian Süssmayr, 2005)
 

Thomas Ruff

Thomas Ruff

ma.r.s.

14.09.2012 - 03.11.2012
Thomas Ruff
3D-ma.r.s.03, 2012, Chromogener Abzug
255 x 185 cm, Ed. 3/ 3
Copyright: Thomas Ruff
Courtesy Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle

Thomas Ruff, der zu den weltweit bekanntesten und erfolgreichsten Fotokünstlern zählt, stellt bereits seit drei Jahrzehnten regelmäßig in der Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle aus.
Wir freuen uns, zur Open Art neue Arbeiten aus seiner jüngsten Serie „ma.r.s.“ präsentieren zu können. Die Grundlage stellen von der NASA über das Internet publizierte präzise Schwarz-Weiß-Bilder unseres Nachbarplaneten. Sie zeigen uns nicht unvertraut wirkende Landschaften aus trockenen Flussbetten, Berggraten und Kratern. Thomas Ruff staucht die von der Sonde senkrecht erfassten Bilder zu Schrägansichten und ermöglicht in Verbindung mit ihrer Kolorierung die Vorwegnahme einer Perspektive, wie sie sich einem zukünftigen Marsbesucher auf die noch unberührte Landschaft bieten würde.
Neu sind Thomas Ruffs Experimente mit der 3D-Technik. Mittels einer speziellen Brille wird die Wahrnehmungsveränderung sichtbar: Berge springen dem Betrachter entgegen, Schluchten ziehen sich zurück. Aber auch ohne Brille betrachtet faszinieren diese Arbeiten mit ihrer intensiven und zugleich diffusen Farbigkeit und laden dazu ein, mit ihren optischen Möglichkeiten und Effekten zu experimentieren.
 

Goshka Macuga

Goshka Macuga

29.06.2012 - 11.08.2012
Goshka Macuga, Anti-Collage (Harald Szeemann), 2011

In unserem Showroom zeigen wir neue Arbeiten aus Goshka Macugas Einzelausstellung ‚Untitled’, die kürzlich in der Nationalen Kunstgalerie Zacheta, Warschau, stattfand. Auch hier betreibt sie tiefbohrende, archivistische Untersuchungen, diesmal im Hinblick auf die Zensur in der polnischen Kunst.
Goshka Macuga, 1967 in Warschau, Polen, geboren, lebt und arbeitet in London. Sie studierte an der Wojciech Gerson School of Art, Warschau, an der Central St. Martin’s School of Art, London und ist Absolventin des Goldsmith College, London. Goshka Macuga war Teilnehmerin der berlin biennale 2008 und wurde im selben Jahr für den Turner Prize nominiert. 2011 erhielt sie den Arnold Bode Preis, sie ist Teilnehmerin der gerade eröffneten dOKUMENTA (13).
 

Anders Clausen

Anders Clausen

29.06.2012 - 11.08.2012
Die Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle freut sich, eine neue Einzelschau des Künstlers Anders Clausen zu präsentieren.
Die diesjährige Ausstellung knüpft an seine zweite Einzelpräsentation ‚Nero Tools’ in der Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle im Jahr 2009 an. Schon damals interessierte sich der Künstler für die Prinzipien unsere Konsumgesellschaft. Neben Skulpturen, die er aus verschiedenen Alltagsgegenständen und Massenprodukten zusammensetzte und durch Präsentation auf schlanken Sockeln zum Kunstwerk erhob, zeigte er Vergrößerungen von Titelblättern deutscher Computerzeitschriften, deren grelles Design die Ängste der Computernutzer mit Titeln wie ‚Gute Tools, böse Tools’, ‚Daten retten’ oder ‚Vista geknackt’ direkt ansprachen. Ausgehend von dieser Ausstellung entwickelte Anders Clausen in den darauf folgenden Jahren einen Werkkomplex, der sich intensiv mit der Ästhetik unserer Computerwelt auseinandersetzte und insbesondere die Architektur des Computerdesktop in den Focus stellte. Screenshots unserer ‚Tools’, die wir alltäglich nutzen und nur unbewusst betrachten, werden vielfach vergrößert und geraten dadurch unausweichlich in unseren Blickpunkt. Die großformatigen Bilder, deren klare, technoide Sprache uns durch die alltägliche Arbeit vor dem Computerbildschirm vertraut ist, erscheinen nun gleichzeitig fremd. Anders Clausen überführt die digitale Welt der Computer in unsere analoge Umwelt und hinterfragt unsere Sehgewohnheiten: Nebensächliches tritt in den Mittelpunkt.
Seine erst kürzlich entstandenen Arbeiten wiederum brechen die kühle Ästhetik auf: Wischspuren unterbrechen die strenge Komposition und bringen eine individuelle, menschliche Handschrift zurück ins Werk. In der aktuellen Ausstellung wird der Künstler sowohl Wandarbeiten als auch Skulpturen präsentieren.
Anders Clausen, geboren 1978 in Kopenhagen, Dänemark, lebt in Berlin. Er besuchte bis 2007 das Royal College of Art in London. Im selben Jahr zeigte die Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle die erste Einzelausstellung des jungen Künstlers weltweit. 2012 nimmt er an der Gruppenausstellung ‚Out of Focus’ in der Saatchi Gallery, London, teil.
 

Slawomir Elsner

Slawomir Elsner

11.05.2012 - 23.06.2012
Slawomir Elsner, Odyssee 3, 2012,
Zeichnung und Aquarell auf Papier

"Marginal" bezeichnet etwas am Rande Liegendes, Nebensächliches. Slawomir Elsner bezieht den Begriff auf seine Serie "Populaire", eine Serie von Buntstiftzeichnungen, die der Künstler durch den vandalistischen Akt des Zerreißens ihrer Mitte beraubt und nur am Rande liegende Fragmente übrig lässt. Das Kunst gewohnte Publikum überrascht zunächst die Verschwendung, die der Künstler an den virtuos gezeichneten farbenfrohen Papierarbeiten betreibt. Er schafft etwas und zerstört es teilweise wieder. Durch die Vorenthaltung des eigentlichen, zentralen Motivs wird der Betrachter, getrieben von seiner menschlichen Neugierde und seinen Sehgewohnheiten, dazu veranlasst, seine eigenen Assoziationen und Imaginationskräfte einzubringen, um das rudimentäre Werk im Geiste zu einem heilen vollständigen Ganzen zu vervollkommnen. Während dieses Prozesses erkennt er mehr oder weniger deutlich die pikante Motivik der nach pornografischen Vorlagen der 1970er Jahre erschaffenen Zeichnungen und wird damit unfreiwillig zum Voyeur, obwohl es eigentlich rein garnichts zu gaffen gibt. Einmal mehr spielt Slawomir Elsner mit der Wahrnehmung des Betrachters und präsentiert etwas von ihm Geschaffenes, enthält durch seine Entscheidung, nur Bruchteile davon zu erhalten, das Ergebnis vor und erzeugt gerade dadurch das eigentliche Kunstwerk.
Mit der Wahrnehmung spielt auch das in der Ausstellung gezeigte Werk "Odysee". Drei Männer wandern durch eine Wüste, der Horizont verschwimmt diffus in einer Luftspiegelung. Das Bild hängt an seiner oberen rechten Ecke an einem Nagel, schräg, als sei es von der Wand gerutscht. Aber hinge es gerade, würden die drei Männer scheinbar aus dem Bild kippen. Der imaginäre Perspektivwechsel findet im Auge des Betrachters statt.
Geplant ist weiterhin eine Serie von Portraits, jedes monochrom gezeichnet in einer anderen Farbe eines Buntstiftsatzes, die mit der Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle verbundene Personen und Künstler zeigen werden, und zusammen eine hauseigene orts- und menschenbezogene Installation begründen.
Slawomir Elsner wurde 1976 in Polen geboren und kam als 11-jähriger nach Deutschland. Er lebt und arbeitet in Berlin und kann seit seinem Abschluss an der Kunsthochschule Kassel auf eine beachtliche Reihe von Gruppen- und Einzelausstellungen zurückblicken, die weltweit von Zürich, Warschau, Paris, London, Madrid, New York und in zahlreichen deutschen Städten stattfanden, so zuletzt 2011 im Marburger Kunstverein (Titel: Marginesy). Seine nächste größere institutionelle Ausstellung wird der Gewinner des Falkenrot-Preises 2012 ab Mai im Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin, haben. Zur Ausstellung entsteht ein Katalog.
 

Chen Wei

Chen Wei

23.03.2012 - 05.05.2012
Chen Wei, Rain In Some Areas, 2010

Die Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle freut sich sehr, die erste umfassende Einzelausstellung des chinesischen Künstlers Chen Wei in Deutschland zu präsentieren.
Chen Wei ist ein Geschichtenerzähler. In seinen Fotografien inszeniert er fantastische Bildwelten, er kreiert Schauplätze und Situationen, zeigt dunkle, isolierte Räume, wie etwa einen verwahrlosten Brunnen oder einen in seinem eigenen Zigarettenqualm sitzenden Mann. Immer ist der Mensch in Beziehung zu seiner Umwelt zu sehen oder seine Präsenz zu spüren.
In seinen Fotografien schafft Chen Wei vielschichtige Kompositionen aus einzelnen miteinander agierenden Elementen, die in Ihrem Zusammenspiel eine Vielzahl an Interpretationsmöglichkeiten eröffnen. So sind auch seine Titel Teil dieses narrativen Geflechts, die oftmals schwarzhumorig die Komplexität des Lebens unterstreichen.
Rain In Some Areas ist der Titel einer Fotografie, gleichzeitig aber auch programmatischer Titel der gesamten Ausstellung. Die Fotografie zeigt ein Zimmer. Ein Sofa, ein Hocker, eine Pflanze und ein Regal, von dem aus eine Wäscheleine wie ein Zeltdach eine Linie gegen die Wand zeichnet. Unterschiedliche Kleidungsstücke hängen daran: eine Hose, ein Hemd, ein beiger Trenchcoat. Ein Ventilator bläst Luft auf eine nasse Bodenfläche. All dies sind komplex und oftmals widersprüchlich kombinierte Zeichen, die Erinnerungen und Bilder in uns auslösen.
Chen Wei wurde 1980 in der Zhejiang Province, China geboren. Er lebt und arbeitet in Beijing. Sein Werk war bereits international zu sehen. So stellte er im Museum of Contemporary Art, Schanghai sowie im Seoul Museum of Art aus. 2011 wurde Ihm eine Einzelpräsentation im Creativecity Center, Yokohama zu Teil.
 

Tim Lee und Anicka Yi

Tim Lee und Anicka Yi

Tim Lee und Anicka Yi

08.12.2011 - 28.01.2012
Tim Lee, Dialogue II Merce Cunningham 1967, 2011