Initiative Münchner Galerien zeitgenößischer Kunst

 

Galerie Tanit

Maximilianstr. 45 • 80538 M
Tel. +49 89 29 22 33 • Fax +49 89 29 57 92
www.galerietanit.cominfo@galerietanit.com
Tue–Fri 11 am – 6 pm

Galerie Tanit project room 5
Maximilianstr. 45 • 5. Stock

Maximilianstr. 45
80538 München

Current exhibitions

Moje Assefjah

Moje Assefjah

You Will Rise Up Again

11.09.2020 - 14.11.2020
Galerie Tanit project room 5 presents for Open Art 2020 the show „you will rise up again“ by Moje Assefjah.
It is dedicated to our Galerie Tanit in Beirut, which was destroyed during the Beirut blast.
Naila Kettaneh Kunigk and her Beirut team are determined to rebuild the gallery and continue to work.
Our thoughts and good wishes are with them.

A SPECTRUM IN COLOUR
When an artist creates, something within her/his persona is released, and directed into the surface that receives the productive action. Mediated and shaped by the tools of practice, and the medium that the artist works with, the artwork comes to life as an extension of the creative impulses, growing and expanding until new meanings are generated. Working in this spontaneous flow, Moje Assefjah has been able to channel her artistic explorations into a distinctive visual vocabulary that celebrates organic forms.
In her works, graceful swirls and lithe forms modulate negative and positive spaces – that could be abstract illusions or landscapes of reality. The seemingly dynamic drapes and ribbons of colour enclose vistas and windows to new worlds, if one looks in between. For Moje, the act of painting appears as a state of mind that allows the abundant flow of various elements, both physical and metaphysical, into visual, perceivable form. The quietly blended colours and textures, the conscious and unconscious patterns, spatial formations and linear constructions serve to develop a dominant mood in a painting that frames the manner in which it is experienced. Several entry points are produced that invite the audience into deeper emotive engagement, individually or collectively.
A cultural sensitivity to her native roots and an osmotic understanding of her contemporary world have inspired Moje on her journey as an artist. It has resulted in a language growing out of a subtly integrated patterning of the representational and the abstract, together. The trajectories of expression touch upon subliminal meanings that are generated with the imagery. The eye, the body and then mind, is led into the tangible experience of the artist, connecting to the moment of her application of the pigment – sharing her gestures as her probable movements traverse the surface. Each work, with scales ranging from small to large, plays out a painterly act of concealment and revelation through the layering of colours and the remarkable divisions of space, the picture planes alive with colours that are vibrant and free. The colours and forms engender a poetic understanding, almost symbolising musical harmony in their picturisation. An energy envelopes the organic forms as they merge, intertwine and separate under the artist’s hand, taking the viewer into a journey of mindscapes.

Moje’s style is continually evolving and strengthening, responding to landmarks in her personal journey. She has the ability to create new and fictional worlds from those that are already existing, constantly uniting fragmentation with solidity, and connecting the physical with metaphysical pathways. (Lina Vincent Sunish)

Mojé Assefjah
Tondo, „You Will Rise Up Again", 2020
Eitempera auf Holz, ø 60 cm
 

Upcoming exhibitions


Past exhibitions

Martin Assig

Martin Assig

St. Paul

16.01.2020 - 14.03.2020
In the work of Martin Assig (1959) a combination of sensuality and spirituality is always felt. The centre of attention in this is the human body: as a classical fertility goddess with numerous breasts, but also as a fragile house of the soul.
A recurring motif is the skirt; it reaches up to the chest that is cut off at shoulder height with a horizontal bar. This forces the association with an altar: body and sacrificial table becoming one.
In his paintings Martin Assig always works with pigments and beeswax. He also uses wax in his charcoal drawings, applying it to the back of the paper to give the drawing a saturated, almost painting-like character. Since 2009 he works on the St. Paul series in which he reflects on his own artistry by using, like Paul Klee before him, a great variety of idioms and themes that he developed over the years. In the series he addresses basic and existential themes like love, death, and how we relate to eachother and the world.

Martin Assig
Marie, 2005
Enkaustik auf Holz
210 x 150 cm

 
 

Looking Back

Looking Back

Into the future

12.07.2019 - 14.09.2019
Closed in august and till september 12.

Before moving into a new space in munich in the fall of 2019, the gallery looks back on its exhibition history of more than 47 years by presenting a group show that features internationally renowned artists who have either started their career with the gallery or are still part of their program since the early beginnings.
Martin Assig
Thomas Demand
Herbert Hamak
Urs Lüthi
Gerhard Merz
Michelangelo Pistoletto

Galerie Tanit was founded by Naila Kettaneh-Kunigk and Stefan Kunigk in Munich in 1972. Walther Mollier became partner in 1981. After several moves the current exhibition space is located at Maximilianstrasse 45. Initial solo shows included Robert Rauschenberg (1975), Michael Heizer (1976) and Jasper Johns (1977). Early photography shows featured Bernd and Hilla Becher’s Industrial Buildings (1977) and Hamish Fulton’s Roads and Paths (1979).

The program of the nineteen eighties and early nineties focused on showing artists from the minimal, conceptual and arte povera movements: Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Robert Mangold, Carl André, Robert Ryman, Brice Marden, John McCracken, Giovanni Anselmo, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Gerhard Merz, John M. Armleder, Olivier Mosset, Hamish Fulton and Urs Lüthi. Thomas Demand and Sylvie Fleury, then new-comers on the international art scene, were also represented (first shows in 1992 and 1993, respectively).

After 2002 the program of the gallery gradually shifted to a younger generation of artists and introduced international artist like Jeremy Blake and Michael Lin to local audiences. The roster of the gallery was extended to include Adrian Schiess, Martin Assig, Julia Mangold, Catharina van Eetvelde and Xavier Noiret Thomé.

 
 

Jean Boghossian

03.05.2019 - 29.06.2019
 

Rania Matar | Bonchull Shin

Rania Matar | Bonchull Shin

13.12.2018 - 26.01.2019
Two shows:
Invisible Children by Rania Matar
Transformation by Bonchull Shin

 
 

Charles Sandison

Charles Sandison

Anima Mundi (die Seele des Universums)

15.09.2018 - 10.11.2018
Plato in his ‘Timaeus’, was the first to provide a complete description of the anima mundi concept, passed down from ancient mythology:
"...Therefore, we may consequently state that: this world is indeed a living being endowed with a soul and intelligence ... a single visible living entity containing all other living entities, which by their nature are all related."
Plato, Timaeus, 29/30; 4th century B.C.
Sandison presents several new works for the exhibition at Galerie Tanit Munich that combine computer codes and projections with drawings and objects, to create an immersive series of artworks exploring the intersection of artificial intelligence and society.
Projections on found objects evoke visions of cities seen from above at night. Signs, symbols and numbers represent human activity and interaction seen in macro. Wall drawings, combined with projected light, create a system of animated mapping that constantly evolves and colonizes the walls of the gallery.
LED screens generate a series of artificially generated digital portraits and landscapes that combine baroque imagery with contemporary visions of cities, environments, and people.
The exhibition aims to create a poetic narrative that allows the viewer to briefly stand back from the complex contemporary world of fast-moving information and perceive it as a whole.

Charles Sandison
Infinity room, 2015
Installation shot
 

Eugen Kellermeier

Drawing & Painting

07.06.2018 - 07.07.2018
 

Narrated

Narrated

group show

21.03.2018 - 02.06.2018
LAMIA MARIA ABILLAMA
JAMES CASEBERE
SARAH CHARLESWORTH
FRANCK CHRISTEN
HANNAH COLLINS
THOMAS DEMAND
ELGER ESSER
ANDREAS GURSKY
CANDIDA HÖFER
SERGE NAJJAR
SIMONE NIEWEG
JÖRG SASSE
STEPHEN WADDELL
MICHAEL WESELY
KIMIKO YOSHIDA

Photos basically show us the “Now”. Not the “Before” or the “After”. At the same time an image triggers our associative imagination and we try to fathom when, where, how and under which circumstances someone decided to capture this very moment. From this perspective, a photo only shows the fragment of a sometimes very long story. But by having the beholder reach out into the future and the past, it also has a narrative component.
The photographers gathered in this exhibition are interested in the study of the Narrative and ensuing stories associated with their work. Artists like Thomas Demand and James Casebere build and rebuild real and fictional rooms and scenes before documenting them. Franck Christen, Elger Esser and Simone Nieweg reflect nature from a rational to a romantic perspective. Some works have a compositional and painterly aspect like the works by Stephen Waddell, Candida Höfer and Hannah Collins, whereas others combine people and their surroundings like Lamia Maria Abillama and Serge Najjar.

 

 
 

The weight of the shadow

The weight of the shadow

Bongchull Shin

26.01.2018 - 10.03.2018
Bongchull Shin, born in Suwon, South-Korea, in 1981, studied at Kookmin University, Seoul (B.A.) and at the Korean National University of Arts in Seoul (M.A.) before moving to Munich. He joined the class of Prof. Prangenberg/Karstieß at the Akademie der bildenden Künste in Munich, finishing with his diploma in 2017.
Glass, bright colors and either natural or artificial light and its resulting shadows and reflections are key elements of Bongchull Shins works. Depending on the perspective of the beholder, his cubes and stripes works can be intensely colorful or completely transparent. The variable components between the glass layers define this, depending on the character of each work.  He creates complex compositions, technically brilliant and beautiful. Alike the minimalists, he wants color to have a reduced, pure and three-dimensional expression, interacting with light and space around it.
“In my series cubes and stripes my desire is to unify glass and light. Depending on the way the light falls and the position of the observer, the shapes and colors of reflections change and intertwine with the textures of the wall behind.”
Growing up on the flower-farm of his parents, his childhood was full of colors and impressions of nature. The circle of life, the constant flow of change, of growth and transitoriness, of color and light, that he experienced, deeply influenced his perception and his work.

For him, everything is connected.
And everything is constantly changing.
“The driving force behind my series broken glass is my interest in language. I write statements and quotations out of glass sherds, creating conflict between form and meaning. Through this conflict, the language gains new meaning and grows.”
In his broken glass works, Bongchull Shin creates antagonistic associations. Poetic statements like “Love”, “Faith” or “Hope” consist of letters, made out of glass shards. Poetic, beautiful and dangerous at the same time, they reflect the contradictory character and ambiguity of existence in a social and spiritual sense.
 

Abstractions Of Light

Abstractions Of Light

22.11.2017 - 13.01.2018
John M. Armleder
Michael Biberstein
Christian Eckart
Herbert Hamak
Adrian Schiess

From the delicate and sublime paintings of MICHAEL BIBERSTEIN, to the reflecting color works by ADRIAN SCHIESS, to the translucent minimalist wall objects of HERBERT HAMAK, the hard edge-minimal and expressive paintings and drawings by JOHN ARMLEDER and the gold leaf plated opulent, but puristic wall works by CHRISTIAN ECKART, “Abstractions of light” shows different variations and developments in the field of painting. Key aspect is the manifold interaction between light and color, from a rather hermetic to a more open, even translucent work concept. Traditional painting strategies have been reshaped and developed, questioning notions of reality, perception and materiality.

Since the 1970s, Michael Biberstein has concentrated on the notion of Landscape in Painting, connected to its historic dimension. His multiple landscapes are also, in the words of the artist, “…landscapes of multiple fields offered to the medium of painting” which the artist would not cease to explore, be it through his different mediums (oil, acrylic, pastel, ink, crayon, watercolor) or through his questions of scale that he tested in its broadest spectrum.

For Adrian Schiess, a picture is successful when the painter accomplishes both nature and a representation of nature. Within his oeuvre, the paintings are variations of what his other works -, the photographs enlarged beyond recognition - have always dealt with: the emergence of the real. Within contemporary art, they show a commitment to abstraction, which, according to Adrian Schiess, is the only way to show that which is not subject to any determination extrinsic to itself.

John Armleder thrives on contradictions and has always been interested in letting what he has called “the great whatever” have full rein. He also claims that his paintings are “inevitable.” If this is a paradox, it is one he cultivates by offsetting paintings made by spilling color down tall canvases as well as those with hard-edge patterning. Common to both idioms is repetition. The incisive, geometric order contrasts the less controlled process of the other.

The works by German painter Herbert Hamak do not fit into one of the traditional categories of art, like painting or sculpture, but cover both at the same time. Hamak’s work concentrates on the purity of colour as it is intensified by the intentional use of resin-filtered light that is the essence of his body of work.

Eckart’s paintings have articulated a dialogue with sculpture since he came to prominence in New York in the 1980s. “I consider my work to be a kind of philosophy of art articulated through the creation and manufacture of objects that embody particular sets of concerns.”For Eckart, “beauty” may be a necessary function in gaining access to a deeper property: the sublime, or what he often refers to as a “meta-sublime.” His oeuvre’s considerable force and simultaneous simplicity is being created by its strong, but pure presence.

 
 

Martin Assig

Martin Assig

Rascheln und Zukunft

09.09.2017 - 28.10.2017
In der Ausstellung Rascheln und Zukunft zeigt die Galerie Tanit neue Zeichnungen des 1959 in Schwelm/ Westfalen geborenen Künstlers Martin Assig. Sie entstammen allesamt der Reihe St. Paul, die Assig 2009 begonnen hat und als scheue Hommage an Paul Klee zu verstehen sind.
Einen besonderen Stellenwert nehmen dabei die großformatigen Zeichnungen ein, die überlebensgroß die Thematik von Leben und Tod, Glaube und Hoffnung darstellen.
Der Wechsel der Motive sowie auch die Unterschiedlichkeit der vielfältigen Materialien wie Wachskreide, Pastell, Aquarell oder Tempera sind Konzept der Zeichnungen. Die verschiedenen Materialien, die Martin Assig verwendet, werden mit Wachs fixiert, was dem Papier Transparenz verleiht und den Farben eine besondere Leuchtkraft gibt. Zu Figuren und Ornamenten kommen in diesen Werken als eigenständige Elemente einzelne Worte oder Sätze hinzu, die bildhaft wirken und den Arbeiten die Struktur von Votivbildern verleihen.
Die scheinbar nicht endend wollende Bildreihung sowie die nunmehr schon einige Jahre andauernde Arbeit an der St. Pauls-Serie ist Assigs utopischer Versuch, die Vielfältigkeit der Welt und ihrer Vorstellung darzustellen.

Martin Assig
St. Paul #704 (es kommt mir so vor), 2015
Aquarell, Wachs auf Papier
194 x 150 cm

 
 

Artistes du Levant

Artistes du Levant

18.05.2017 - 29.07.2017
Hebal el Accad
Etel Adnan
Mojé Assefjah
Flavie Audie
Huguette Caland
Simone Fattal
Samia Halabil
Mona Hatoum
Lamia Joreige
Zena el Khalil
Randa Mirza
Lamia Ziadé

Installation view (from left to right): Etel Adnan, Zena el Khalil & Flavie Audi

RAUM 1 / GALERIE TANIT
Catharina van Eetvelde
"Drawings on the Subject of the Sun"

 

 
 

Back to the 70s & 80s

Back to the 70s & 80s

23.03.2017 - 13.05.2017
with works by
Stephen Antonakos
Micheal Farrell
Hamish Fulton
Don Hazlitt
Michael Heizer
Robert Mangold
Olivier Mosset
Nam June Paik
Jerry Saltz
Donald Sultan
Julian Schnabel
Pat Steir
Michelle Stuart
Michele Zaza

 
 

Charlotte Mumm, Bongchull Shin, Barbara Ullmann

Charlotte Mumm, Bongchull Shin, Barbara Ullmann

Between the Lines

19.01.2017 - 25.02.2017
While reading the powerful, imaginative poems by Dylan Thomas, one senses shades of meaning behind the plain text. The tone colour and phonetic picture of his works generate a complex personal imagination, filtered by our own very individual lyric compass.

Something simliar happens to the beholder of artworks by Charlotte Mumm, Bongchull Shin and Barbara Ullmann.
The intricacy of their objects, paintings and paperworks doesn‘t entirely reveal itself at first sight. Light and shade, colour, space and body are being defined and built into unique imaginative concepts. Lines connect and construct, surfaces are being cut, space is divided and layered. Intense and powerful, dark and heavy parts alternate with delicate, light and transparent forms and surfaces.
 

Youssef Abdelké

Youssef Abdelké

Bleak and Black

11.11.2016 - 14.01.2017
"Abdelke`s fish is not a fish: it is an arrow, a beam, a breath, a whispered call of life. Yet it is also a fish. But it flies like a bird in the night in which we find ourselves once again immersed. In a large charcoal drawing on canvas, he stares at us, as if the image of death was more alive for Abdelké than that of life." Alain Jouffroy

Youssef Abdelké’s highly acclaimed work is renowned for its sin­ister under­tones and unique sym­bolism which expose the bru­tal­i­ties of life. The Syrian painter breaks with tra­di­tion through his unique approach to still life drawing. Trivial items such as a flower, a fish or a shoe are the focal point of Abdelké’s works.
“In order for a bone frag­ment, a dish or an empty sar­dine to do what a king and his horse or a woman and her pos­ses­sions usu­ally did, the artist is required to exert excep­tional efforts and to dis­play great skills,” art critic Emil Manaem writes in his intro­duc­tion to Abdelké’s book. “In his draw­ings, Abdelké allows simple things in life to impose their sovereignty over spaces, pushing them from the very begin­ning from the realm of realism to the realm of sym­bolism.”

Youssef Abdelké was born in Qameshli (Syria) in 1951. He studied at the Faculty of Arts in Damascus and at the École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris.
After more than 25 years of com­pelled exile and of being for­bidden to go back to Syria, it was finally pos­sible for him to go to Damascus in 2005 and to organise a large exhi­bi­tion there.

Youssef Abdelke's works are part of a large number of museums and insti­tu­tions, including The British Museum in London and the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris.
 

Sonja Braas

Sonja Braas

A survey

09.09.2016 - 29.10.2016
Including the new Series An Abundance of Caution
Sonja Braas’ work (*1968 in Siegen) is fascinating and secretive at the same time. Majestic to dramatic perspectives on nature or irritatingly detailed structures are frequent topics in her work. But they somehow seem strange and artificial. This impression is part of her concept, as the photographs are taken from models, that she previously constructed with extraordinary precision in her studio. Enigmatic, sometimes uncanny scenes are frozen in time. In her new series „An Abundance of Caution“ - having their debut in our current exhibition - Braas stays true to her visual and artistic concept, while introducing new topics at the same time. Her models still work as a basis for ideal and perfect images that simulate natural phenomena, manmade objects or structures. From the very beginning of her career, she addresses the idea of a certain media-influenced image of nature and the complex world around the individual. It is the ubiquitous nature of the media that generates the demand for an “authentic” representation. She studied Visuelle Kommunikation and Foto-Filmdesign at the Fachhochschule Dortmund in 1991 and in 1992/1993 at the Parsons School of Design, New York. In 1995/1996, she received a Fulbright Scholarship for fotography at the School of Visual Arts, New York. She lives and works in Germany and New York and her works are part of international Collections like Albright Knox Gallery, Buffalo, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Fotomuseum Winterthur, Städtische Galerie Wolfsburg, Museum Küppersmühle, Duisburg, Sammlung Deutsche Bank, Munich RE and EON AG.
Sonja Braas
An Abundance of Caution, Container 2015
Pigment Print
172 x 140 cm
Edition: 8+2 AP

 
 

Serge Najjar & Martin Spengler

Serge Najjar & Martin Spengler

Sculpting the shadow

25.06.2016 - 03.09.2016
Left: Serge Najjar, Shadows Cascade (Detail). Inkjet print on ultrasmooth fine art paper, mounted on aluminium. 70 x 70 cm
Right: Martin Spengler. Centerpoint-Sollbruchstelle (Goldener Schnitt) (Detail). 2016. Corrugated cardboard, gesso, black lead, permanent marker. 95 x 95 x 14,5 cm
Copyright © *The artists and Galerie Tanit

Architecture - as a constructive detail, or even as a whole façade - as social unity or as a stage for human interaction and communication - is an inspirational source both for German artist Martin Spengler (*1974), and for Lebanese photographer Serge Najjar (*1973). Documented from unusual perspectives, reconstructed or recreated by changing space and colour, light and shade and set in scene, Architecture becomes a fascinating rediscovery.

Martin Spengler's (* 1974 in Cologne) artwork is about structures, which form certain social occurrences and/or highlight architectonic functions of certain incidents. It is about social basic structures, which exist everywhere. “Standing next to the Cologne cathedral as an individual and looking up, or watching a highway crossing from above, I can sense the enormous amount of input, reflection, planning, development, material etc. brought up by so many people cooperating to create it. I also used great force by car-jacks and tons of pressure to create the object „Sollbruchstelle”. We compressed a four meter stele, which I had prepared before, to break on a predetermined point of the sculpture. It can be seen as a reference to the readymade sculptures of crushed cars by John Chamberlain. Recently, I started working on pedestals which I combine with sculptures, wheras each of the component is depending and completing each other to form the object´s unity.”

Serge Najjar’s (*1974 in Beyrouth) approach to photography derives from his passion for modern and contemporary art. He easily references Kazimir Malevich’s “Architectons”, Josef Albers’ abstract compositions, Robert Mangold, Ellsworth Kelly, Frank Stella and Sol Lewitt.
The graphic approach on the Russian Avant-garde and, specifically, Alexander Rodchenko catches Najjar’s interest early on his career: deciphering the image and its construction. Shadow and light, passerby, subject, worker; thus architecture and man stay on the edge of abstraction. Whether colour or black and white photographs, Najjar’s body of images forms a coherent sum that emerges instantly, without mediation, as a dance between flatness and depth. Shadows become geometric sculptures; three dimensional shapes morph into planes.
The photographs always create a singular space that is inhabited by the onlooker within the space they are presented in. In a sort of backward movement, Najjar uses photography in the digital age while adhering to an approach that embraces the formal rigour better known from analog photography. Perspectives tilt, the image is constructed, reality is cut, riffled through and rebuilt by the lines that surround us.

Kunstwochenende München / Art Weekend Munich
24 June 2016 / 6 - 9 pm
25 & 26 June 2016 / 11 am - 6 pm
 

Sadik Kwaish Alfraji

Sadik Kwaish Alfraji

A Dream Within a Dream

20.05.2016 - 18.06.2016
Sadik Kwaish Alfraji
Detail, A Dream Within a Dream, 2015
99 x 415 cm
Front side: Indian ink, rice paper on linen
Back side: Indian ink on linen

Multimedia artist Sadik Kwaish Alfraji explores what he describes as ‘the problem of existence’ through drawings, paintings, video animations, art books, graphic art, and installations. The shadowy protagonist who occupies Alfraji’s interdisciplinary works represents a black void, a filter that allows him to explore the intricacies of navigating the precarious nature of modern existence. By rendering his solitary figure as a charcoal-coloured silhouette and minimising the formal properties of his compositions, Alfraji captures the expressed movement and subtle inflections of the body in psychologically laden environments.
The artist often records his own narrative in black and white depictions of his recurring character, particularly the loss, fragmentation, and lapses in time that underline the experience of exile.
Born in Baghdad, Iraq in 1960, Sadik Kwaish Alfraji lives and works in Amersfoort, The Netherlands. He received a Bachelor of Fine Art in Painting and Plastic Art from the Academy of Fine Arts, Baghdad in 1987 and a High Diploma in Graphic Design from CHK Constantijn Huygens, Netherlands in 2000.

Alfraji’s works are housed in numerous private and public collections including the British Museum, London; National Museum of Modern Art, Baghdad; The Art Center, Baghdad; National Gallery of Fine Arts Amman; Shoman Foundation, Amman; Royal Association of Fine Arts, Amman; Novosibirsk State Art Museum, Russia; and the Cluj- Napoca Art Museum, Romania; Los Angeles Country Museum and Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.
Alfraji was named Artist of the Year at the Esquire Middle East Awards in 2012. A monograph on the artist was published by Schilt Publishing, Amsterdam in 2015.
The artist’s recent solo shows include Ayyam Gallery Beirut; Ayyam Gallery Al Quoz, Dubai; Beirut Exhibition Center; Ayyam Gallery London; Ayyam Gallery DIFC, Dubai; Stads Gallery, Amersfoort, Netherlands; Station Museum, Houston; Stedelijk Museum, Den Bosch.
Selected group exhibitions include TRIO Biennial, Rio de Janeiro; P21 Gallery, London; the British Museum, London; 56th Venice Biennale, Italy; Abu Dhabi Festival, Abu Dhabi; Maraya Art Centre, Sharjah; LACMA, Los Angeles; FotoFest Biennial, Houston; Samsung Blue Square and Busan Museum of Art, South Korea; Ikono On Air Festival, online and broadcasted; Mori Art Museum, Tokyo; Institut du Monde Arabe; Centro Cultural General San Martin, Buenos Aires; Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Algiers; and Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art, Qatar.
 

painting 16.0

painting 16.0

08.04.2016 - 14.05.2016
John M Armleder
Martin Assig
Michael Biberstein
Herbert Hamak
Adrian Schiess
 

Mojé Assefjah

Mojé Assefjah

26.02.2016 - 30.04.2016
On occasion of Mojé Assefjah's participation at "Morphology of Archive", Museum of Goa, India
"Each painting is to me a vision, a scene, a view. They are an invitation for the eye to look through a window opened to a nostalgic space.
I use the traditional eggtempera medium. My interest for the italian Renaissance, is infused with the mystical beauty of the visual productions of Ancient Persia. The free gesture inscribes itself through wide ribbons. The flexibility of the movements and the strokes calls to mind calligraphy.
The spaces are built by the dialectic between opacity and transparency, closeness and distance, putting layers over layers to construct the depth. The spectator might sometimes see vegetal , plant forms, which are quite visible in bold floral pattern of carpet design and othertimes might see baroque drapery. It was interesting to me to investigate how can i transfer my work to a carpet, where the frames and patterns are previously existing and to bring  this to a vertical plan.
I like to tell stories of dreamed landscapes between abstraction and figuration."
Mojé Assefjah, 2016

Darmian, 2015
eggtempera on canvas
80 x 120 cm

 

 
 

Randa Mirza

Randa Mirza

And now, I am not I and the house is not my house

05.02.2016 - 02.04.2016
Beirutopia  (2011 - ongoing)
Since the end of the Lebanese civil war in 1990, Beirut has been striving, to regain its glamour and splendor through the efforts of reconstruction, in the aim of reconstituting the old myth of a city commonly referred to as the Paris or Switzerland of the Middle East. This photography project is a portrait of Beirut’s urban future. It aims to raise questions about the devenir, or the becoming, of Beirut and its associated representations, characteristics and how they culminate to become the future essence of the city.
Beirut is currently undergoing a construction boom on the back of large inflows of foreign capital and the historical profitability of the real estate sector. To advertise construction projects, developers display large billboards in situ reproducing the proposed reality to come. These displays exemplify computerized “biopolitic” renderings that simulate the building, its interior, surroundings, illusory residents and their lifestyle.

The photography project intends to capture billboard images that represent virtual buildings framed within their real environment. This dichotomy and juxtaposition give the photographs a sense of “oddness” that reflects the current transformation of the city. The latter is demonstrated by the use of scale, layering and image framing as tools to underline readings of the city.

Beir-utopia is, in essence, the title of a counter-utopian situation, one that does not differentiate between illusory images and the pastiche narrative they embody. This confrontation allows for spaces to be redefined and their potential encouraged as new forms of identification arise and are re-appropriated within the wider social and architectural fabric of the city. The photographs become spaces of resistance.
Text by Randa Mirza and Stephanie Dadour
 

Ricardo Brey

Ricardo Brey

the moving wall

29.11.2015 - 30.01.2016
“What fascinates me, is the origin of the human race, our culture and society. From the relationship between different life forms and between the communities of earlier and today, we can deduce the state of the present world. We can learn from our evolutionary past and thus consider our current condition critically. From a global approach man can emphasize the underlying connection between everything around us.” (Ricardo Brey, 2002)

For Ricardo Brey the title „The Moving Wall“ expresses the significance of drawings in his current solo exhibition at Galerie Tanit Munich. Drawings have been of great importance in his work, which stretches over 30 years. He has – and still is – engaged in large drawing projects like “Universe” (2002 – 2006) and “Annex” (since 2003 and still in progress). Brey’s drawings are often integrated into Leporello books to emphasize their tridimensionality. In his recent project “Every Life Is a Fire” drawings, which are inside of books, which are put into Boxes, have a relationship with framed drawings on the wall and, as Brey calls it, “contaminate them”. The Boxes were displayed at the 56th Biennale di Venezia this year. They open a field of new thinking for the artist. After having worked with Tanit already for 22 years and having had his last solo show at Tanit 14 years ago, this is a chance to gain a precise and complex view of his work, intertwining drawings and objects.

The work of Ricardo Brey could be seen in the 56th International Exhibition of la Biennale di Venezia “All the Worlds Futures” curated by Okwui Enwezor exhibition until the 22nd of November 2015. This wide-ranging exhibition with over 53 artists arranged in what was termed by Enwezor as a “Parliament of Forms”. Ricardo Brey was born in Havanna and currently lives in Ghent. His oeuvre stretches over thirty years with each work bearing the consistency of his thought process and fitting together much like an enormous puzzle in time.

From the very beginning, Brey’s art seemed imbued with poetry, melancholy and mystery. Everything Brey produces, seems to offer a connection to his past work. Older motifs acquire new relevance and live on in later work. Brey’s interest in themes such as the relationship between nature and culture, the interaction between different cultures and religions, and issues of cultural identity are crucial to understanding his process and interpreting his art.

For Brey all materials are able to transmit a spiritual quality. Previously used objects maintain and transmit a quality through patina created by their earlier use. Natural materials and objects like eggshells, feathers, soil or wood are integrated into his work. These materials have all had an earlier quotidian existence and thereby acquire a new semantic in his art that conveys new meanings. Since childhood nature has held a great fascination for Brey.

Ricardo Brey’s participation in Documenta IX in 1992, curated by Jan Hoet, brought international attention to his work and marked a turning point in his life. He moved to Belgium and since then has been living and working there with his family. His work has been shown in numerous international institutions. Brey received a 1997 Guggenheim Fellowship for Installation Art and Sculpture. In 1998, he received a prize from the Flemish Ministry of Culture.Since 2002 he has committed himself to develop large complex projects, “Universe”(2002-2006), “Annex”(2003 –ongoing) and “Every life is a fire”, (2009-ongoing). This last project is exhibited for the first time in its totality in the 56th International Exhibition of la Biennale di Venezia “All the Worlds Futures” curated by Okwui Enwezor. A major surveys exhibition of Breys works have been recently held: “The Futility of Good Intentions” at the National Fine Arts Museum in Havanna in 2014 and “Fuel to the fire", in M HKA in Antwerp from February to May 2015.
 

David Kramer

David Kramer

Kramerika!

11.09.2015 - 07.11.2015
David Kramer
Living the dream, 2012-15
Oil and Enamel on Canvas
167 x 193 cm

Born in New York in 1963, David Kramer brings us for the first time in Germany paintings, drawings, a film and an installation deriving directly from his world of interests.
His work sits squarely on the fence between a love for American POP art and a darker satire that nervously wakes him up at night and out of his comfortable American dream. Humor in the work comes from the distilling of spoon fed versions of the good life that are served up in advertisements and life-style magazines. Kramer is a child of the 1970's and grew up in the suburbs of New York City. His home was filled with magazines of that era with their booze and car advertisements that spoke of what life will offer him once he becomes an adult. While the imagery might be recognizable, the text is all Kramer’s own brand of self-aware humor as he confesses his own wanderlust search for the elusive adult life that was promised in these pages.
From back then, Kramer also brings something suburbians - the supposed "Picture perfect American family" - held sacred, the basement bar.
His, is not a regular one, it is a VIP bar where everyone becomes VIP once they indulge the specially labeled beers and the boozy conversation in the "privacy" of his own world. This three-dimensional handmade installation from wood and cardboard (Cheap material) invites us to lose an exaggerated pride by "knocking back a few".
David Kramer's "Empire" just like his drawings using text and image, but the attenuation of life is set in motion by the changing light and the stream of ships.
The film was shot with a surveillance camera, showing the Empire State skyline from afar. Like Warhol's idea behind his "Empire", Kramer wants us "to see time go by" but in the age of smartphones and google, he humorously makes a 24 hour cycle into a 4 minutes film piece. The spectator being accross the river is faced with a sentence representing his hubris desire of being part of this grandiosity, almost out of reach being too fast...too far.
Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" - The hymn to freedom, joy and brotherhood - (performed in April 1942 for Hitler's birthday by the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Wilhelm Furtwängler) is just the cherry on top of this concocted satire.

 
 

The Mirror of Illusions

The Mirror of Illusions

27.06.2015 - 05.09.2015
Jeremy Blake
Sonja Braas
James Casabere
Elger Esser
Jörg Sasse
 

Christian Eckart-Herbert Hamak-Adrian Schiess

Christian Eckart-Herbert Hamak-Adrian Schiess

Reflections of Light

19.03.2015 - 13.06.2015
How light is light?
Is colour an illusion?
Does the sublime exist?

The artists Christian Eckart, Herbert Hamak and Adrian Schiess explore the phenomenon of light in very different ways. They work with a monochromatic approach to pure colour that makes light visible. Thus colour turns into an active event that changes in relation to the shade and the intensity of light, or the claim is made that painting can depict the undepictable. The exhibition "Reflections of Light" has the artists enter into a complementary, contradictory dialogue, poses new questions and contributes to an exciting discourse.
 

Fouad Elkoury

Fouad Elkoury

The lost empire

30.01.2015 - 07.03.2015
 

Mojé Assefjah

Mojé Assefjah

Nostalgia, blue is the colour of your wing

06.11.2014 - 10.01.2015
Copyright © *Mojé Assefjah, All rights reserved.

New Paintings
 

Group Show – Jardins de Bagatelle II

Group Show – Jardins de Bagatelle II

12.09.2014 - 31.10.2014
Curtis Anderson, Martin Assig, Ricardo Brey, Wim Delvoye, van Eetvelde Sautour, Lionel Estève, Michel François, Laurent Grasso, Mona Hatoum, Urs Lüthi, Marcel Odenbach, Tony Oursler, Charles Sandison, Rosemarie Trockel, Hossein Valamanesh, Ghassan Zard
 

Stephanie Senge

Stephanie Senge

Kauf Dich frei! / Buy yourself out!

04.07.2014 - 06.09.2014
Abbildungen (Detail):
Stephanie Senge - Original/Dr. Liebe/der Geschmacksorgasmus/K 186 - 50 x 70 cm
Copyright © *2013 Stephanie Senge. All rights reserved.
 

Martin Assig

Martin Assig

Manchmalimmer

09.05.2014 - 28.06.2014
 

Abdul Rahman Katanani

kids, barbed wire and a dream

16.01.2014 - 08.03.2014
 

Herbert Hamak

Herbert Hamak

Voyage Pittoresque – New Works 2013

11.10.2013 - 30.11.2013
Installationsfoto Museum Haus Lange Krefeld
 

Urs Lüthi

Urs Lüthi

Spazio Umano & Territories

20.06.2013 - 05.10.2013
 

Charlotte Mumm

Charlotte Mumm

capsulated drifts

08.05.2013 - 15.06.2013
Artist Statement
I generally approach my work with a direct and intrinsic interest. I believe that ideas are connected with subjective motivations and perceptions, which result in stand-points. They assert themselves without a hierarchy, but with meaning.

In my exhibition „capsulated drifts“ at the Galerie Tanit, I show, among other things, the wall installation „Hello, I‘m Nobody and who are you?“ and three works that I have developed for the presentation at New Positions at Art Cologne 2013.

The wall installation „Hello, I‘m Nobody and who are you?“ consists of a neon sign, two fanfolded drawings and a wall drawing. The sentence of the neon sign reads „Hello, I‘m Nobody and who are you?“, this refers to a
nearly eponymous poem by Emily Dickinson, which has accompanied me for awhile. It is about being a Somebody or Nobody. Are you living for external appreciation or are you no one and therefore have all the freedom in the world because oneself determines the limits in secrecy but not the status. This up-and-down of paradoxes is also linked to the drawings of the fanfolds. Who are you and what is expected? The capricious faces of the wall drawings dissolve evenly spread in three points. These faces also connect to the work „diffusion“, where they appear on dices.

The ensemble „rooms“ consists of 44 wood panels alternating with 44 drawings on paper. The panels have flocked dots, which represent a selection of various constellations. The constellations and their stories contain a general cultural memory. Human beings search for and find orientation and order in the perception of abstract shapes or seemingly chaotic accumulations by associating them in the form of stories or subjective projections. Drawings of my personal constella-tions/circumstances are the counterpart to the panels as they portray a virtual abstraction of aspects in my inner and outer conditions. Internal situations, questions and free forms, that either drift into the abstract or the figurative depending on the viewing angle, appear. A total of 88 pictures – 44 realistic and 44 idealistic, depending on the viewing angle – are on dis-play. In total this equals the number of official constellations.

This work is accompanied by a sculpture entitled „capsulated drift“. On the one hand, the sculpture seems like a foreign body; on the other, it looks like an aggressor. It could be interpreted as the squaring of the circle manifested in the form of a body. The industrial grey coating acts neutral, but it can change depending on perception and projection.

There is also a small object on the wall entitled „diffusion“. It is a little box of one-way mirror with dice that I designed. Abstracted faces can be seen on these dice, which are based upon the classical guidelines of cube design. These faces and their moods or peculiarities diffuse and dissolve into a state of indifference. Observers can look inside the box, where mindsets are being reflected. They infinitely refer to themselves and are their one and only point of reference.
Charlotte Mumm, 2013
 

Michelangelo Pistoletto

Michelangelo Pistoletto

A selection of works from our shows 1982 – 2002

24.01.2013 - 27.04.2013
 

Hwang Young-Sung

Hwang Young-Sung

Contours of Reform

27.10.2012 - 24.11.2012
Curated by Sam Bardaouil & Till Fellrath

The exhibition “Contours of Reform” is the first large presentation of the work of South Korean painter Hwang Young-Sung in a German gallery.
The show documents the artist’s unusual formalist development, from classic figurative painting during his days as a student in Paris fifty years ago, to his own semi-abstract visual vocabulary. Yet, Hwang Young-Sung has always remained faithful to his motif: the illustration and questioning of family, society, and shared identity. In their concision, his works create a universal image that is always formally asking new questions and developing further.
Hwang Young-Sung (born in 1941 in Korea) lives and works in Gwangju, South Korea.

Kunstwochenende München 2012
26. - 28. Oktober 2012
Fr. 18 bis 21 Uhr
Sa. und So. 11 bis 18 Uhr
 

Sonja Braas

Sonja Braas

Fotografien

14.09.2012 - 20.10.2012
 

Gilbert Hage

Gilbert Hage

Screening Berlin. Eleven Views Of Mount Ararat

13.07.2012 - 08.09.2012
Gilbert Hage, Eleven Views Of Mount Ararat,
2009, Archival Print on Aluminium,
110 x 90 cm

Each year, as tourist vacationers, tens of millions of humans yield to an extra conditioning: they follow the directives of a guide, the rythm of a group, and are instructed cursorily in the doxa on various countries turned venues. Under the pretext of anticipating their needs, desires, and even their whims, they are dissuaded from any independent choice. In a sightseeing boat during a guided tour of Berlin, Gilbert Hage resisted - while fixed to his seat - by means of photography the concomitant insidious screening of Berlin. The result, “Screening Berlin”, is a number of moving encounters in the form of chance compositions of landscapes and people.

Referring in its title to the famous series “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji” by the Japanese artist Hokusai, which later augmented to forty-six prints and which was produced between 1826 and 1833, Gilbert Hage’s “Eleven Views of Mount Ararat” depicts another preeminent mountain, one also viewed by many as sacred, this time as it appears in the context of various houses of members of the Armenian community of Lebanon. (Jalal Toufic)
 

Bodo Buhl

Bodo Buhl

Skulpturen & Photographien

02.05.2012 - 30.06.2012
Bodo Buhl, oh no, 1998, Plexiglas

„Man hoffte, dass er sich etwas Ausgefallenes einfallen lassen würde. Sie sollten nicht enttäuscht werden. Es war der kostspieligste und fantasievollste Beitrag. Er wollte die Menschen dazu anregen, über das Universum nachzudenken. Trotz des Protestes von Bürgern, Politikern und Presse wurde die Arbeit realisiert. Aber er blieb nicht ungeschoren. Strenge Auflagen verteuerten das Projekt, so dass er auf sein Honorar verzichten und sich mit dem Ruhm zufrieden geben musste.“

Mit einer Ausstellung von Skulpturen, Fotoarbeiten und Zeichnungen, zeigt die Galerie Tanit erstmals eine Werkgruppe aus dem Nachlass von Bodo Buhl (1951 – 2010).

Buhl entwarf seine bildnerischen Ansätze vor dem Hintergrund von Minimalismus und Pop Art als jene wichtigen wegweisenden Bewegungen seit der zeitgenössischen Kunst der 1960er Jahren, mit denen sich eine jüngere Künstlergeneration konfrontiert sehen musste. Buhl suchte gemeinsam mit anderen Gleichgesinnten, die Ende der 1970er Jahre einen „Münchener Aufbruch“ propagierten, die kritische Auseinandersetzung mit den zeitgleich virulenten künstlerischen Konzeptionen.

In seinen Skulpturen und Photographien erscheinen die formalen Wesensmerkmale aus Minimal und Pop Art als zwei Seiten einer Medaille, die Buhl in einer synthetischen Verbindung auffasste. Seine individuelle Bildsprache entsprang einer anti-expressiven Haltung, die der absoluten Subjektivierung der künstlerischen Praxis widersprach, mit der die Malerei äußerst erfolgreich den zeitgenössischen „Hunger nach Bildern“ stillte.

In diesem Sinne entwickelte Bodo Buhl das künstlerische Selbstverständnis eines „Ultras“ – um den Titel seiner Ausstellung von 1988 im Kunstverein München zu zitieren – lange bevor der Begriff als Bezeichnung für zweifelhafte Ausprägungen von Gruppendynamik bekannt wurde. Seine hyperaffirmative Verbundenheit mit den Werten der Moderne bekundet er in einer jede subjektive Handschrift verweigernden Formensprache, deren Unterkühltheit den inhaltsentleerten Selbstzweck der konsumistischen Waren- und Medienwelt subversiv hochleben lässt. In der 2005 erschienenen Publikation über die Zeichnungen fasste Heinz Schütz die künstlerische Haltung Buhls in einer prägnanten Formulierung zusammen, deren Beschreibung sich über die Skulpturen hinaus durchaus schlüssig auch auf seine Fotoarbeiten und Zeichnungen übertragen lässt: 
„Die architektonisch infizierten Skulpturen Buhls greifen die Sprache der Moderne auf. Mit ihrer glatten Oberfläche und aggressiven Eleganz treiben sie die tradierte Moderne noch einmal ‚futuristisch‘ auf die Spitze und nähern sich dabei dem Design, ein Design, das ohne Funktion und nichts als Oberfläche ist.“

Die Ausstellung zeigt Skulpturen, Photographien und Zeichnungen aus verschiedenen Werkphasen, die den Schaffenszeitraum von 1986 bis 2005 umspannen.
Ulrich Wilmes, Haus der Kunst
 

Nadim Asfar, Sonja Braas, Elger Esser, Stephen Waddell

Nadim Asfar, Sonja Braas, Elger Esser, Stephen Waddell

photographieren!

02.03.2012 - 14.04.2012